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Unread postby Rhiannon » Thu Aug 05, 2004 3:17 am

robbyjo wrote:What kind of bug is that, Wild-Eyes? Seems like a cockroach to me...

-- Rob


Oddly, it looks like a cockroach to me too, in that picture. However, I assure you it's not. It's actually a type of beetle (don't ask me for the scientific name!). I found it buzzing around loudly in my standing lamp, and ushered it into a jar and outside. It was about the size of a wasp, but pretty tame. Just some sort of standard local beetle around here.
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Unread postby DruidWu » Thu Aug 05, 2004 3:38 am

Wild-Eyes wrote:
robbyjo wrote:What kind of bug is that, Wild-Eyes? Seems like a cockroach to me...

-- Rob


Oddly, it looks like a cockroach to me too, in that picture. However, I assure you it's not. It's actually a type of beetle (don't ask me for the scientific name!). I found it buzzing around loudly in my standing lamp, and ushered it into a jar and outside. It was about the size of a wasp, but pretty tame. Just some sort of standard local beetle around here.


Looks like a grasshopper to me.
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Unread postby Bricks » Fri Aug 06, 2004 8:22 pm

Theres alot of insects here... and I've seen that around, they are harmless, and pretty cool to watch.
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Unread postby Liu Yuante » Tue Aug 10, 2004 1:39 am

This is one of my big female Hysterocrates gigas (Cameroon red)tarantulas demonstrating how to disarm a human armed only with a ball-point pen. I was actually trying to prod her out of her burrow, and she decided to lean back into threat posture. I tried to move her into a better position and she struck the pen and then grasped it between her fangs. When tarantulas get mad they tend to rear back, and sometimes they keep going until they are lying flat on their backs, which is how this photo came about.

http://www.geocities.com/belewfripp/gigas2.jpg


Here's a fun one that shows some of the size of my biggest Theraphosa blondi (Goliath birdeater tarantula) female, as she was all stretched out trying to climb the side of her tank and I draped a tape measure in. Unfortunately, because the tape measure was interfered with by her hide it actually is sticking out, though this is hard to tell in the photo, which makes her look a little shorter than she is. She has since grown about another inch and prompted me to share this photo as she is currently ambling about her tank.

http://www.geocities.com/belewfripp/smallblondi.jpg

And here's one of two Brachypelma albopilosum (Honduran curlyhair tarantula) making the beast-with-sixteen-legs:

http://www.geocities.com/belewfripp/curlymating.jpg

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Unread postby Bricks » Tue Aug 10, 2004 3:55 pm

Wow, those are awesome. And huge too :O Can you play around with them? Not meaning play catch or something, but let them out and hold em? And also, when they bite, does it hurt?
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Unread postby Liu Yuante » Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:18 pm

Bricks wrote:Wow, those are awesome. And huge too :O Can you play around with them? Not meaning play catch or something, but let them out and hold em? And also, when they bite, does it hurt?


Some of them you can, some you can't (or, put more accurately, shouldn't). I tend to be fairly good at calming the more 'grouchy' kinds, so I have held a number of species that I would caution others not to handle (do as I say, not as I do, etc.) The first two are pretty feisty, especially the first one, and they have very powerful chelicerae ('jaws') so I don't handle her. I have handled my goliaths, they are a little less upsettable, but also bigger. The curlyhairs are pretty docile, even my female who is less so than most. I have only ever been bitten once, by an adult female Costa Rican zebra (Aphonopelma seemanni) that decided she would rather eat her suitor than mate with him. She had him pinned to the ground with her fangs, one of them right through his 'chest' (prosoma) the other nipping the top of his 'abdomen' (opishtosoma). I got in there with my bare hands and broke it up, and managed to save him by patching his wounds with superglue (despite it being filled with toxic chemicals, tarantulas never seem to react adversely to it). In the fracas the female got me with one of her fangs right on the cuticle of the index finger of my right hand. Also, I had a feeble adult male Usumbara orange (Pterinochilus murinus red color-form) use his fangs as 'crutches' so to speak, climbing up my hand, but his fangs were pretty tiny, and there was no venom injected. Plus, even the largest fangs are rather slender despite their length; the worst part about a tarantula like the goliath birdeater is the presence of urticating bristles on its abdomen, which it can kick; they used to be what was used to make itching powder.

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Unread postby Rhiannon » Wed Aug 11, 2004 6:26 am

Those are very lovely spiders, and that picture with the ball point pen greatly amuses me. I've always been fascinated by the idea of owning tarantulas as pets.



On another note, new pictures from when I went hiking Monday morning along the creek. All unaltered except for size and, in a few cases, a crop.

Rushing River 1
Wildflowers
Rushing River 2
Waterfall (taken by Andy)
Rushing River 3
Wildflower with a Hidden Bug
Rushing River 4
Mountain
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Unread postby Ranbir » Sun Aug 15, 2004 3:12 pm

Finally moved them from my old infected computer to the safe one.
Japan, Summer of 2003. (Fairly large filesizes, because the image sizes have been untouched.)

The mini Shinto Shrine
Rock Garden
Pond

The quality astounds me, looking back, its like some painting.
I'll add a few more when I come to the conclusion they are worth showing.
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Unread postby robbyjo » Sun Aug 15, 2004 6:40 pm

Adrian, those pictures of spiders are great. *shudder* :)
Wild-Eyes, these are nice pictures. The flowers are just lovely.
Ranbir, I like the Shinto shrine one... :D

-- Rob
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Unread postby James » Fri Aug 20, 2004 8:10 am

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