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Questions Thread

Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2004 7:19 pm
by Sima Hui
Me and Kong Wen have discussed this and have decided to make a questions thread for basic life. This includes asking people things you don't know and would like to find out. Me and Kong have agreed that if this topic becomes spammy, then it should be locked, so pleeease don't spam in my lovely thread. Hope I explained it right. Here's an example...

Q: I heard that hair and nails are made of the same stuff. What's it called?
A: (Other member) That's right! It's called keratin and it is indeed, the stuff that makes hair and nails.

Hope that's clear. :wink:

Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2004 7:24 pm
by Kong Wen
Addendum: This is not a trivia thread or anything like that! Sima Hui originally intended this to be a basic questions & answers thread, like that in the SGYYS, i.e. a thread where you can ask short questions that don't need huge elaborations, debate, or a whole thread to explain the answers.

Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 4:19 am
by Master Still Water
Good, I'll get the ball rolling:


I remember me and my dad arguing about the color of an object when there is no light to illuminate it. I'm adamant in my belief that the color of an object becomes undefined when there is no light illuminating it, for example: you're standing in a room holding a red apple, you turn off the light, now the apple doesn't have a color because there is no light to define it. Dad believes the opposite, and thinks the apple is always red.

Which one of us is correct? Maybe I can sort this out once and for all :x ....

Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 4:27 am
by robbyjo
Actually, IIRC, a color is basically a reflection of a particular wavelength of a ray. So, for example, an apple looks red because it only reflects red wavelength and absorbs others. Color black on the other hand, absorb all wavelength. So, black actually is a state that there's no light reflected. Likewise, white is a combination of "all visible colors" in spectrum. Materials have colors because of its reflectivity...

-- Rob

Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 5:06 am
by Kong Wen
robbyjo wrote:Actually, IIRC, a color is basically a reflection of a particular wavelength of a ray. So, for example, an apple looks red because it only reflects red wavelength and absorbs others. Color black on the other hand, absorb all wavelength. So, black actually is a state that there's no light reflected. Likewise, white is a combination of "all visible colors" in spectrum. Materials have colors because of its reflectivity...

According to the scientific idea of light reflection and colour, there are two possible answers to the original question.

1) The apple is black, because there is no light reflecting off of it to make it appear as any other colour.

2) The apple is still red, because it has properties that affect its reflectivity and make it appear red under normal lighting conditions. Even though you can't see the redness because it is not currently reflecting, the apple's redness is defined by the properties that make it appear red in a reflecting situation (not simply by your perception of redness).

Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 5:17 am
by robbyjo
That's true, Kong. Every material has their own properties that reflects the "color" to the eyes. Not only reflection, colors may also caused by interference of wavelength (e.g. in case of pearls), pleochroism (i.e. "gliterringness", in case of crystals), fluorescence, and dispersion light (in case of sky). Each of these has different properties...

-- Rob

Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:35 pm
by SesshomaruTenseiga
Uh, this may be stupid, but on a song, I heard the expression "sleight of hand." What does it mean?

Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:43 pm
by robbyjo
Sesshomaru, it's supposed to be "sleight of hand"

Microsoft Encarta Reference Dictionary wrote:1. skill with the hands: skill or dexterity with the hands in performing magic tricks, card tricks, or juggling. Also called legerdemain
2. deceptive skill: any kind of skill by which something happens without it being obvious how it is done


Hope this helps,
-- Rob

Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:44 pm
by Sum Gai
I think it's "sleight" of hand. It means to be quick and skilled with your hands, it's usually used in reference to a magician or performer who can perform some sort of magic trick by quick hand work.

EDIT---
Man, I always get beat to the punch on these things. I need to type faster.

Unread postPosted: Sun Aug 22, 2004 4:42 pm
by GLUEMAN
I heard that from the day you are born and until the day you die your
eyeballs don't grow one bit; is this true ?