Favorite Musical?

The place to hang out with your fellow scholars, have a drink, share a laugh and enjoy each other's company.

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Mon Apr 20, 2020 10:08 am

In 2011, the Phantom of the Opera (now known as the one where Andrew Lloyld Webber created a sequel to rewrite the ending) celebrated its 25th Anniversary at the Albert Hall, Sierra Boggess as Christine, Ramin Karimloo as the phantom, Hadley Fraser as Raoul. As we watched this on youtube, we did vaguely think this is familiar, we recognized Boggess but we weren't entirely sure for awhile if we had seen this. We had seen this before and we will almost certainly see this again someday, we both loved it.

Visually a good production (had to use screens for backgrounds given the stage), costumes work well (bar Christine's masquerade dress), they do some great stuff with the chandelier (when they first fire it up, it still has a shock factor), though once or twice the microphones did seem to crackle but there are some good sound effects for when Phantom is off stage. The backing dancers and cast avoided the trap of "do the scripted thing then just stand there" which helped make things feel alive and they gossiped or looked wary, whatever the scene required.

Has a strong cast, Wendy Ferguson's performance as Carlotta Guidicelli keeps her character to the fore, the best singing voice but of a different more operatic style to the others, she gives real personality to the character, some nice comic touches with petulance but able to shift into uncertainty and alarm as things go against her. Boggess has always been an impressive singer when we have seen her in musicals and is a skilled actress, Karimloo is a strong singer and puts emotional power behind vocal and facial performance, managing to give the split performance that lures and frightens Christine. Fraser as Raoul gets something of the third wheel hand and isn't as strong a singer (on this performance) but the role doesn't require that, his singing is good and he gives a charismatic but not too charismatic display, good petulance and even natural entitlement when required. The only cast member that felt clunky at times was Liz Robertson as Madame Giry, a fierce and intimidating presence but was one dimensional.

The Phantom has that right mixture of good support songs and the classics (Think of me, Music of the Night, The Point of No Return and so forth), songs and musical beats that reoccur at the right times (All I ask of you). I prefer a softer version of Think of Me but the only song here that didn't land was "Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again" where Boggess went too strong and too dramatic. The cast had strong singers but also knew how to play the emotional beats within them, be it the comedy as the managers (Barry James and Gareth Snook) sing about the notes they are getting, Karimloo's broken hearted "All I ask of you" that then fires into rage.

Or how three romance songs take every different tones as they fully use Boggess abilities as a romantic lead, a dark alluring seduction of Christine who is falling deeper into the heady mix in Music of the Night, (then the naughty grin as she makes her fateful move), the almost Disney straight romance of All I Ask of You with sweet ending, Christine's strong seduction of her suitor in the Point of No Return which swaps roles without playing them exactly the same.

The Phantom musical is a good story, the love triangle (if the males are a bit prone to "come here, obey me"), the allure and danger of the phantom, the contrasts in Christine's choices, the thoughts left between the lines, the themes that build up between the trio. Done right (which is "why love never dies" rejection of the story of its predecessor was puzzling), get a strong sense of the characters, what Christine might face with whoever she goes with, the tragedy of the Phantom and they did that so when the ending came (which I have seen fall flat before), it lands. The build up, the emotionally astute performances lead to a moving and mixed (in a good way) ending.
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Mon Apr 27, 2020 10:16 am

Watched Love Never Dies, sequel to the Phantom, a recording of the 2011 Melbourne run with Ben Lewis as the Phantom and Anna O'Byrne as Christine. My thoughts at the time were good production, ok songs, a story that shot itself in the foot and a decent but not great cast. This time it felt better, partly becuase I was prepared for the botched ending and less concentration on "does Andrew Lloyd Webber hate Phantom of the Opera?" Not sure a retcon has been so infuriating since Twin Peaks built up a romance then pretended it never happened, it was far easier to detach myself from "what the?" feeling.

It is a good production, the costumes work well, the set design is impressive particularly in “The Beauty Underneath”, camera could be a little jerky in movement once or twice but got such a great angle that it wasn't clear there was an audience, it was as if it was just a production for a film. Only time audience made noise was for the title song Love Never Dies and for the ending applause which worked well for this.

The story suffers from the ret-con and I'm not sure it is needed, there are good themes and ideas that I didn't think needed to try to change what happened in first musical. Raul (a very good performance by Simon Gleeson) gets given more depth, Meg's strand (a good Sharon Millerchip) touches on some intresting ideas that do well when given a chance but its focus is on the returning stars. Ending, I do see what it was going for but does leave a slightly... bitter might be overdoing it but a slight wince at how clumsily it is handled. Some clever nods to the first musical that were enjoyable to see with the props, music and lines.

The songs, there isn't a classic (Love Never Dies could be perhaps) among this production but Lloyd Webber knows how to use music for themes, either borrowing from first musical or using tunes from this one, gently repeating to good effect. I found the songs of the carnival leaders never clicked, some songs within the production I liked: Devil Take the Hindmost having a bit more oomph first time but was still fun, Love Never Dies works well as a song and with the context of the musical, the enjoyably passive aggressive Dear Old Friend. Plenty of others that... if for a bit of a tweak here like removing a verse from Only for You, Look with your Heart was played strongly when it felt like it should be done as a lullaby, some like Till I Hear You Sing one wonders if other singers might have made more of it.

I do think doing this production a week after the Phantom was a... mixed blessing. It makes logical sense, it is the sequel, there are plenty of nods so do that while first is fresh in the mind and people who might skipped a failed musical I would assume are more likely to do it when free and still on a high from the first. The problem is that it invites immediate comparisons particularly of the lead singers, Lewis and O'Bryne are up against the excellent Ramin Karimloo and Sierra Boggess only a week later. I did find myself thinking at the end of some songs how the other might have got more out of them.

Ben Lewis is a good singer and a pretty good actor based on this, some nice comedy at the right time but he lacks a bit of the dark charisma of the Phantom to really draw you in (or Karimloo's ability to use his singing voice for powerful emotion). Amanda O'Bryne is a good singer with a good voice, as an actor she did fine, she bounced well off Gustav with good tenderness and she had her moments with others but she isn't the strongest actress either, she couldn't bring that little bit of extra emotion or sizzle to the songs nor bring strong chemistry with others.

It is flawed but I liked it, I'm glad I watched it and I wonder if this might have done better if it hadn't been a sequel to one of the greatest musicals of all time and the expectation that brought. I would watch another production if one was made and turned up on TV though chances of that is low
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Mon May 11, 2020 7:51 am

Tried By Jeeves for an hour ie the first act of two, turning a Wodehouse story (my sister says it follows one of the book's closely) into a musical comedy. It has a good idea to open, the camera playing the role of a visitor to a church charity banjo concert, the audience dressed up in period costume and coming across the helpers (played by the cast), it has a sense of it’s time and place.

Musically? That was quite nice, nothing memorable but happy enough tone to go through the moment. The songs I heard had a tendency to go on a little too long but Travel Hopefully was nice and pleasant while "The Hallo Song” was gently amusing about British manners. However the main play and it's comedy didn’t work for me, I could see what it was trying to do and the idea isn't bar. However Steven Pacey as Wooster didn’t get the comic delivery right at all, the prop comedy fell flat, several comedy lines just never felt right, I could see what they were trying but most jokes didn't land. Some of the side characters managed a bit of laughter but it wasn’t consistently enough to keep going, even as the comedy improved I found it was simply time to turn off, too much was not clicking.
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Wed May 13, 2020 6:10 pm

Most have probably seen this news but from July 3rd, the stage version of Hamilton will be on Disney+
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Sun Fin » Sat May 16, 2020 1:33 pm

I got to see Hamilton with my wife in the West End. We're incredibly excited to see it again on Disney+!
Have a question about a book or academic article before you buy it? Maybe I have it!
Check out my library here for a list of Chinese history resources I have on hand and my tumblr to see if I have reviewed it!
User avatar
Sun Fin
Librarian of Shen Zhou
 
Posts: 7906
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 9:20 pm
Location: Vicar Factory

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Sat Jun 06, 2020 7:24 am

Watched Hairspray Live, NBC's 2016 production with Maddie Baillio as the lead Tracy Turnbland. Good production values, the set work is impressive to create the feeling of the street and good prosthetic work for Harvey Fierstein as the mother. As a musical, the songs had energy, there were some good singers like Jennifer Hudson as Moutermouth and strong dancers like Ephraim Sykes as Seaweed (though felt Baillio was not as strong as others around her as a dancer), varied styles and it went along nicely though none of the songs were memorable.

This is a musical with plenty of jokes including in the songs but as a whole the comic timing wasn't right, jokes just didn't land with the exception perhaps of the Von Tussels (Chenoweth and Dove Cameron), this lacked effective humour but one could see the attempt. Sweetest romance was between the lead's parents (Fierstein and Martin Short) who had the feeling of an eternal affection and their song "(You're) Timeless to Me" was nice. Derek Hough was a good host as Corny Collins, energetic, good dance, cheerful with the sense of the right kind of figure to host such a musical show with "The Nicest Kids in Town" reflecting an effort to balance off all sections in terms of popularity. Ending felt a little too sweet and happy happy.

On racism which the musical tries to cover, it did better then the film version I had seen in mostly avoiding the "white lead being the answer" problem. There are great lines about racism and great use of unawareness or "I'm totally against but" however the delivery didn't match up to the quality of the ideas so it lacked a certain emotional force. It still has something to say and the ideas behind it are good ones so worth seeing just for that, mixed it well while keeping the tone happy and energetic.
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Fri Jun 19, 2020 4:04 pm

With no "Shows Must Go On", watched the 30th anniversary ABC/Disney The Wonderful World of Disney Presents The Little Mermaid Live!. A mix of showing the famous Disney film then cutting to the stage where new cast would sing a song (both from the film and the musical) with Auliʻi Cravalho and Graham Phillips (really got the crowd going when he appeared) as Ariel and Prince Eric. I assume the original show had ad-breaks as every now and again would cut for a five second behind the scene look or joke as a segue-way.

The big problem with this is it is a mixture from column a and a mixture of column b, both shows glimpses of what the film (which I have seen) and the musical (which I haven't) could be and to make one want to watch it but it doesn't show either at their best nor makes a compelling whole. With the film being a classic, it doesn't do any favours with the live action singers who put their own spin on it while the old songs are in your head, prompted by seeing bits of the film, so got those comparisons going on rather then being left to their own merits.

The old film, mostly it still holds together well, plenty I have forgotten, humour, well drawn, the father has some scenes that still land strongly but the adjoining passages are cut so scenes feel a bit rushed and don't land in same way watching the full film would do. The colours have aged badly, I have no idea what feasibility there was for improving the brightness in time, but the colours now feel washed out. Vocal work mostly remains good (bar Jason Marin as Flounder), there is humour, romance and so on, it was nice seeing that again.

With the live action, the set work and choreography was impressive, good use of the crowd to make them feel involved. The costumes had some misses (Ariel's wig is difficult, Shaggy's red suit for Sebastian felt less crab, more pop stars of certain bygone eras), the puppets were not going to compare favourably to the drawn version seen just seconds ago but some decent uses. The cast are good singers, Queen Latifah plays Ursula, Shaggy as the crustacean, John Stamos (he got big cheers) as the chef, Amber Riley of Glee as one of Triton's daughters.

One had a mix of film songs like under the sea and stage musical ones ones like daughters of Triton, the stage musical ones hold up pretty well, the songs are well sung and usually with their own flavour, enjoyed Sebastian's songs particularly. The problem is partly the same ones as any one off special, the cast don't seem to have had time to hone their musical delivery with jokes so they don't zing. As well as the comparisons brought on by seeing animated just a few seconds ago, the likes of Cravalho have their own ideas for their characters but we don't get to see her Ariel built up, we see the animated one being built up and not her own spin on it so it doesn't gel together.

The individual parts are nice, there are good songs, a sense of humour, a nice story and I would see both parts individually but trying to mix two things together meant neither was seen at their best and despite a nice time, this felt a little disappointing by the end

======

Watched NBC's 2015 The Wiz Live!, an adaptation of the soul music Broadway musical of Wizard of Oz, new comer Shanice Williams played Dorothy. I had heard good things here and there about the Wiz, not a big fan of Wizard of Oz but thought I should give this a try. End result? Amusing, good singers and dancers, some nice songs, pacing felt a bit rushed, a musical that was stronger first half then second half. Glad I watched it, preferred it to the traditional Oz film and had a nice time after a recent run of stuff that had been a bit unsatisfying.

Good production, it doesn't have the vast street by street staging of some of the other live productions, this is based on one stage but no worse for it (also not sure how one would remotely pull that off given subject matters), good sets, very good costumes (the glowing eyes of the Kalidah are creepy in the dark lighting of the forest), sound system worked well. Everyone seemed to be a good singer and very good dancers, enjoyable songs with no clunkers though some could go on a verse too long. Very little Toto

Got a good early impression as it built up why Dorothy wants to leave, tensions with her loving aunt (Stephanie Mills), nice early song looking back. The Munchkins and Good Witch Addaperle (Amber Riley) provide some early humour with word play and bits of deliberate incompetence. When Dorothy goes searching for the Wizard, the best scenes come as she meets her three companions Scarecrow (Elijah Kelley), Tinman (Ne-Yo) and the Cowardly Lion (David Alan Grier), they establish a good sense of personality and have some great intro songs (You Can't Win certainly touched on deeper things beneath the humour). There is humour between the four and a bond builds, felt like each of the four had their own sense of style, I really enjoyed Alan Grier's performance as the lion (the front, the humour, the style with the poppies) but they other three put in very good performances.

The second half was fine but not as good as the first, the wizard meeting was a bit disappointing with Queen Latifah not bringing a sense of wow or authority (we did wonder if swapping her and Mary J. Blige as Wicked Queen of the West would have got more out of both actresses). There was humour with the wicked queen of the west or Common as the gatekeeper but pacing, though always quick, started to become too quick as it leapt from scene to scene. Didn't really delve into the group as it went from magic user to magic user, undermining the changes of the characters, and even the ending scene felt very abrupt (though the goodbye scene before that was sad). The music was fine but didn't feel it matched up to the first half, though did enjoy "Don't Nobody Bring Me No Bad News". The second half did go along nicely, I wasn't bored and had nice time but it just wasn't as strong as the first half for me.
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Sun Jun 21, 2020 10:39 am

Watched NBC's 2014 adaptation Peter Pan Live! of the 1954 musical which had been pushed back a fortnight from Shows Go On due to Black Lives Matter protest. Allison Williams takes lead role (traditionally female role apparently), Taylor Louderman as Wendy, Christopher Walken as Hook, Minnie Driver as narrator. Had been slightly wary going into this, Peter Pan has never been my favourite but can be pleasant escapism, imdb rating was poor.

Like the other NBC's productions, it didn't lack for behind the scenes quality. The Darling house and room looked nice, Neverland went with big colours and pulled off some of the fantasy aspects, costumes worked well (particularly liked the Lost Boys costumes), the crocodile did however look nothing nothing like a crocodile (the purple and almost psychedelic colours I can take but the shape seemed strange). The flying was extremely well done particularly in the Darlings House though during fights it seemed like the cast involved didn't quite know how to fight if one was in the air, action was otherwise decent.

Opened well enough, the pompous and strained but loving father (Christian Borle) was amusing, the lullaby Tender Shepard has a really nice bit in it, Wendy falling for an oblivious Peter had some sweetness and amusement. But by the time the group had flown away (and taking a moment to adjust to the attempts at posh British accents), it had a feeling of going on a bit too long, that Peter hadn't wowed with his entrance.

This musical had some really good bits but it is moments of gold behind a lot of things that just don't work well enough, I sat through to the end but not entirely sure it was worth it. There was plenty that did work, the jokes about Peter's obliviousness, the sadness that is Peter and the lost boys desire for a mother though could have been built up more, a brilliant joke about the ending of tales the lost boys have heard, some nice moments of tension between "father" pan and "mother" Wendy. A well done ending, a good support cast, a nice sense of humour. Musically, the dancing is good, none of the songs are bad but none of them stand out either, the lullaby songs have moments within them that stand out but the overall song is fine.

The biggest problem is probably two key cast members, Williams and Walken. Williams has her moments where she gets it right, the sense of arrogance and obliviousness for example but she lacks spark in this production, she can hold a tune but there isn't the sense of the daring, whimsical figure from her, she can't provide the driving force or the charm for this musical to draw the viewer in. Louderman is the strongest performer in the production, the sense of being besotted, the rivalry with others, the frustration and the warmth, had a good singing voice.

Walken was, in my view, very poor and the kind of delivery that at times seemed disinterested. That may partly be the style he went for that, when it goes wrong, can come across as... very laid back but failed to land the emotional beats of Hook's hatred, didn't land the humour and when he was meant to provide a bit of swashbuckling flair, that fell flat. Hook looks like it could be an entertaining villain but you didn't get that from Walken. Borle provided a bit of humour as a competent Smee but the pirates were a bit of a let down. Got the sense there songs and time on screen was meant to provide a bit of flair, threat and humour, it never quite managed any of that. A few giggles perhaps and well done dances but it didn't come alive.
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Sun Jun 28, 2020 5:32 pm

Watched High School Musical, I remember when it came out it was both a huge hit and considered a sign that the generation that watched it would doom us all, had no taste, yada yada. With Shows Must Go On doing Sound of Music, decided to give this a try and see what we thought. End result? Flawed, very very flawed but did just enough that "I'll see the sequel" as felt quite warm by the end after initially failing to settle into it.

Musically? Nothing memorable, the cast are full of notable singers but these weren't the best performances of their career with some songs perhaps having had potential that wasn't made the most of but most were not stand out songs anyway, big song like "When There Was Me and You" felt coming in from the studio, the Stick to the Status Quo had nice ideas but the execution was clumsy, joint romance songs like the decent Start of Something New lacked romantic chemistry.

The duo vs duo songs where the rivals Sharpay Evans (Ashley Tisdale) and brother Ryan (Lucas Grabeel) vs the leads aka basketball captain Troy Bolton (Zac Efron) and new girl Gabriella Montez (Vanessa Hudgens)... both times we felt the rivals versions were better. Grabeel gave the best singing performances in this film and Tisdale was the best performer during songs, as a duo their voices didn't always meld together but their versions tended to have a bit of fun. Problem is we are meant to be rooting for the leads as a duo, that they deserve to the leads for the musical and each time, the film was saying one thing and our ears another.

The story feels like a family friendly version of Grease (no high speed car races for example) with safe messages for the intended audience (like real friends will support your tastes rather then mock), things one has seen before and a musical to get into. Nothing wrong with that, it has a certain charm and there are moments where the writing does something good with the themes (like recalling happier times), other times the writing is clumsy. The teachers show a lack of professionalism but Alyson Reed has some comedy moments and coach Bolton (Bart Johnson) has some good scenes with son.

Jokes are more miss then hit, usually due to writing but only Grabeel really delivers the jokes well and maybe Olesya Rulin though her characters style feels a little at odds with the film. The leads come across slightly "so special" early on but as they fade more into the school, it gets away with this and they are likeable individuals, none of the characters are done in depth and they fill roles but there are some good friendship bonds. Bits of the ending song don't quite match up with the actual story but enjoyed the post-credits sequence

The casting directors seem to have done a good job in identifying future talent for the cast but not sure Kenny Ortega got the best out of them. Some of this may reflect the cast's expirence back in 2006 (this film may make one feel old...) vs where they have pushed onto now to be fair but felt like the cast generally wasn't quite clicking in terms of comedy or giving notable performances. Some solid support work by likes of Corbin Bleu and Rulin, Grabeel did his job well to provide humour, Efron was certainly trying to give something extra to his performance even if it wasn't quite working.

All in all, it had enough feel of good intention, nice friend dynamics and moments that worked that I left feeling warm towards it and that I had a nice time, I will eventually watch the sequel.
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Favorite Musical?

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Sun Jul 12, 2020 12:55 pm

Saw the little known musical Hamilton. Production impressive, couldn't spot the merging three productions into one, good camera angles and clear sound, got the swearing down to fit age rating, good costumes. Cast as a whole was good, the only actor that didn't consistently hit the high notes for me was Daveed Diggs who was great as Lafayette while his style as Jefferson sometimes fell flat for me. Comedy was a bit more miss then hit, it could be amusing but felt I was missing something via watching it via TV rather then being there, had a good sense for sadness and tragedy in making those moments have impact, romance was well done as never went for grand romance but something a little more gentle and human.

My knowledge of Hamilton is one documentary I saw but I didn't feel confused, the musical did ensure a foreigner with no knowledge could understand, it did build it's support characters sufficiently so found it easy to distinguish figures I had never heard of before. I did feel in first half that they tried to be balanced, Hamilton is the hero and it clearly admires him but one can see why he riles up others, the likes of Aaron Burr (an impressive Leslie Odom Jr.) is humanized even if they don't approve of his attitude. It explained concepts like "how duels were actually fought" via medium of song so people have fun and understand what is going on.

Second half the balance feels titled more towards Hamilton, less sympathy towards the likes of Burr and Jefferson even if "yeah Hamilton has a big mouth..." remains, one issue from the outside felt excuse making
the Reynolds affair, it admits it is problematic but tone felt, perhaps not meant, a little too "just a man" defence
but the ending goes for balance, dives into areas I'm not sure most Americans would know about. Even with King George (Jonathan Groff), he is a comedy character with Groff having a ball with the role but it seems to seek to provide a POV of how the English might be viewing events.

It is a clever musical, the famous BME for all the leads bar the English, the way the lyrics and story link this with the struggles of immigrants and is not afraid to reflect on various themes including how history is made, it is able to "yeah we have no idea what happened here" and make that work as part of the play, it can handle things and scene that could easily look silly with considerable skill. Themes are reoccurring and will come back over Hamilton's life without bashing you over the head and really knit together.

In terms of songs, this has no dialogue. Everything is sung. I am unused to that and it does make the first 40-50 minutes really intensive with song after song as I had to adjust (I was helped by taking a break to adjust). Some songs feel long and wondered if it would have hurt to trim them down a verse or two, nothing stood out as classic or "be in a greatest hits". I did enjoy King George's first song "You'll Be Back" as it takes a romantic style song and corrupts it, there are good explainers like Ten Duel Commandments that explains duels in a fun way, there were moments like Eliza (Phillipa Soo) appeal to Hamilton at the end of "That Would Be Enough" that were moving but the songs as a whole went by, good for narrative but nothing musically stood out for me. I was interested in the characters and the themes (particularly history writing) more then the music/songs.
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 17467
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Previous

Return to The Pub

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

Copyright © 2002–2008 Kongming’s Archives. All Rights Reserved