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Re: History is written by the victor

Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:03 am
by Iain
Kayzr wrote:True to a large extent I'd reckon.

The atrocities of the Allied nations in World War 2 (fire-bombing cities in Japan and Germany with, mass rape of German women by Soviet soldiers at the end of the war, etc.) go totally unmentioned in the history books and yet people are still lectured by the evils of Nazi Germany and, to a lesser extent, the Japanese Empire to this very day.
Well thanks to modern methods of finding information (like google and various war related forums) those kind of atrocities are being brought to the public eye more now I am an active reader of WW2 history and even today I find out something new I hadn't heard of before.

Re: History is written by the victor

Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:26 pm
by Qin Feng
That's common sense, after all, after destroying your enemies, you don't want them to have the sympathies of the conquered population, or any population for that matter. Julius Caesar already did that when he was alive, so go figure.

However something that I find quite interesting is that the Japanese tend to be quite sympathetic towards the defeated people in their history.

Re: History is written by the victor

Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 12:17 pm
by SunXia
Qin Feng wrote:However something that I find quite interesting is that the Japanese tend to be quite sympathetic towards the defeated people in their history.

Uhm I am quite sure that those living in Nanking in the 30s and Manila and Kalagong in the 40s, among others, might disagree with that statement.

Re: History is written by the victor

Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 1:35 pm
by Sun Fin
Qin Feng didn't necessarily mean in every case but certainly there is a trend of samurai's who failed but committed seppuku being honoured, even when on the losing side.

There are individuals in Western culture who I can think of being honoured for individual traits of steadfastness and loyalty, even onto death, but not in the same codified way as in Japan.

Re: History is written by the victor

Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 6:03 pm
by Qin Feng
SunXia wrote:
Qin Feng wrote:However something that I find quite interesting is that the Japanese tend to be quite sympathetic towards the defeated people in their history.

Uhm I am quite sure that those living in Nanking in the 30s and Manila and Kalagong in the 40s, among others, might disagree with that statement.

Let me rephrase that. I find quite interesting that the Japanese tend to be quite sympathetic towards the defeated people in their history, so long as their Japanese too.

Re: History is written by the victor

Unread postPosted: Tue May 28, 2019 6:16 pm
by WeiWenDi
Qin Feng wrote:
SunXia wrote:
Qin Feng wrote:However something that I find quite interesting is that the Japanese tend to be quite sympathetic towards the defeated people in their history.

Uhm I am quite sure that those living in Nanking in the 30s and Manila and Kalagong in the 40s, among others, might disagree with that statement.

Let me rephrase that. I find quite interesting that the Japanese tend to be quite sympathetic towards the defeated people in their history, so long as their Japanese too.


Ehhh... kind of. Sympathetic treatments of the victim by the victor in history aren't necessarily what they seem.

In the case of classical histories, Herodotos often had glowing accounts of Persian bravery, honesty, technological and logistical prowess - not because he was pro-Persian, but rather to amplify and glorify the Greek victory over a superior foe. I'm not as familiar with Japanese history, but I would suspect that given the honour-based culture they had at the time, a similar historiographical dynamic might be at play.