Comprehensive Biography for Ruan Ji

Join the Romance of the Three Kingdoms discussion with our resident Scholars. Topics relating to the novel and history are both welcome. Don't forget to check the Forum Rules before posting.
Kongming’s Archives: Romance of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms Officer Biographies
Three Kingdoms Officer Encyclopedia
Scholars of Shen Zhou Search Tool

Comprehensive Biography for Ruan Ji

Unread postby DaoLunOfShiji » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:45 pm

Ruan Ji, style Sizong (210-263)

The Ruan clan hails from Weishi in Chenliu, in Yanzhou. [1] They were a prominent Confucian family and said to be very rich, however it appears they were not a clan with a lengthy lineage. Ruan Ji's grandfather is the first in the clan to be mentioned in history, but all that seems to be recorded is that he was a local magistrate in the 190s where Wu-di, Cao Cao first raised his army. [2] Ruan Ji's father, Yu, was a jack of all trades. A respected scholar, poet, musician and politician. He began as a student under the famous Cai Yong and would eventually serve the Cao. [3] It is said most of the edicts of the government were written by he and Chen Lin. [4] Ruan Yu held many posts under Cao Cao, most notably in the Secretary position and the Department of Granaries. It's theorized that the position in the Department of Granaries was extremely important as the only other person known for holding this post was Liu Ye, one of the most prominent ministers under Ming-di, Cao Rui. [5] Ruan Yu and Wen-di, Cao Pi, were exceptionally close it seems, and when Yu died in 212 due to illness Wen-di wrote a poem to express his sorrow for Ruan Yu's widow

"Ruan Yu and I were friends of old, but the span of life destiny allotted to him was short, and he died an early death. I cannot think of the
Poetry and politics orphans he has left behind without being sorely afflicted. That is why I have written this expressing the sadness and pain of his wife and children." [6]

Ruan Ji was born 210 and would succeed his father who died when Ji was only 2. [7] Ruan Ji's first true mention appears to be sometime early into Ming-di's reign when he was roughly sixteen years old. He was not interested in the political climate and the factions of the court. He lived in his home province and one time he went to speak with Wang Chang, a partisan of Sima Yi and father to Wang Hun. Wang Chang had asked Ruan Ji to come see him in order to interview him, and when Ruan Ji arrived Wang Chang found it impossible to get even a single word out of Ruan Ji. Wang Chang was filled with admiration and considered him unfathomable. [8]

The purpose of this meeting would have been to, at the age of sixteen, rate one for the beginning of their civil career. [9] Ruan Ji's silence was his first sign of rebelling against the idea of being trapped in the political life. However thing sdon't always turn out as one plans. Ruan Ji next pops up sometime around 239 when he was appointed to a low advisory position for Sima Yi. [10]

Donald Holzman makes it clear that while Ruan Ji was in the office of Sima Yi that does not reflect his support for the Sima, nor disloyalty to the Cao. [11] However a piece entitled 'The Poetry of Ruan Ji and Ji Kang' states this was his definitive stance in supporting the Sima. [12] This pro-Sima message does not make any sense at all. Any open ideas of Imperial Ambitions were not revealed until 10 years later unless one argues the position that Sima Yi was behind Zhang He's death as to remove opposition from him. So with this in mind, how could Ruan Ji be throwing his definitive support into the Sima regime when, at the time, there was not one and there was no public idea of one?

Ruan Ji's position advanced when the new Grand Commandant, Jiang Ji, heard of Ruan Ji's immense ability. He called him to his office, however Ruan Ji would place himself into legend by submitting a memorial outright refusing the post and renouncing the life of an official. [13]

"My guilt in daring to write to you is worthy of death, worthy of death! I humbly beg to remark that because my illustrious Lord unites all the virtues in his person he now occupies a most exalted position; brilliant men all look up to him, and superior intelligence make their way towards him. The day he set up his headquarters everyone counted upon becoming a subaltern in it, but when the letters of appointment were sent out, your servant was the first to receive one. When Bu Shang dwelt on the banks of the Xihe, Wen, Marquis of Wei, treated him with the utmost deference; when Bu Shang lived in the shade of Millet Valley, Prince Chao shared his carriage with him. Now, the reason that princes, lords and great men demean their persons and lower themselves to men who wear common cloth, who dwell humbly and who gird themselves with belts of simple, tanned leather, is that these men are endowed with the true Way. I have the virtues of neither Cao nor Bu Shang, and I have their rusticity: it is in no way fitting that I should be selected. In order to keep from occupying an important official post, I am soon going to set about ploughing on the sunny side of the eastern flooded fields and send out my taxes of millet. I am sick and exhausted with carrying firewood and the strength of my legs is not great: I could not bear to accept your command to fill an official position. I beg you, take back your misplaced bounty and you will add even greater luster to your impeccable nominations!" [14]

Jiang Ji could not let such a promising talent go so easy, and so despite receiving this refusal to assume the post, he sent a subordinate to go and bring Ruan Ji to him. Hilariously though Ruan Ji had already left after delivering the memorial in the first place, and this infuriated Jiang Ji. Word had reached Ruan Ji's home and everyone begged him to assume the post. He finally relented and accepted. [15]


In 247 Cao Shuang, on the advice of Deng Yang and the others, no longer consulted Sima Yi on matters of the state. [16] Cao Shuang and his partisans had taken control of all matters of the court and Sima Yi took this opportunity to feign illness and retire from office. [17] Cao Shuang's group turned their eyes on Ruan Ji and they would attempt to recruit his talents. He Yan was able to recruit him to Secretary of the Minister for State Affairs, however in typical Ruan Ji fashion he quit and left, citing illness. Cao Shuang himself then approached Ruan Ji as he was flabbergasted that Ruan Ji would decline. However, again, Ruan Ji declined the post once more and would hide away in the countryside. [18] Two years later Cao Shuang and the others were ousted in a coup by Sima Yi on February 5th [19] and the people praised Ruan Ji's foresight to avoid disaster. [20]

Ruan Ji's alignments in this whole debacle between the Cao and Sima. Ruan Ji's father, as previously stated above, was a loyal subject to Cao Cao and a close friend to Cao Pi. His family were from the very same region that Cao Cao raised his first army. He was born into the Wei Dynasty and his first official post came under them as well. One can also point out that Ruan Ji did serve the Sima under Sima Yi, and later on Zhao. If that is the case does that no mean he supports their usurption? I share Donald Holzman's view that it is truly impossible to tell at all. The political climate Ruan Ji lived in was one that did not accept decenters. The Sima claimed to be loyal supporters of the Cao, and anyone that denounces the Sima could be branded as denouncing the Cao. There exists a preface to a poem, however, that may exactly reflect just how Ruan Ji felt.

"During the Jiaping period (249—254) I acquired a pair of young
doves and fed them day after day on millet. Later they were killed by a
dog, and I wrote the following fu about them (cont..)" [21]

A pair of young doves may refer to Cao Shuang and the Emperor, certainly white doves are conscidered a sign of good government, while the dog is Sima Yi. It is not the first time Sima Yi was compared to a canine after all. There exists the story that states Sima Yi could turn his head around 180 degrees like a wolf. [22] The comparrisons as well as the timing of the poem makes it feel as though he may be referring to his loyalties to the Cao. Is there any proof? Donald Holzman argues in favor of his Pro-Cao views,

"Ruan Ji yearned to participate in the political life of his country, and it is his inability to do so honorably, without betraying his legitimate ruler, that forced him to lament in verse, to proclaim his attachment to higher moral values and his disgust with the vile opportunism he saw about him." [23]

Yen Yen-chih shares a similar argument,

"It is said that Ruan Ji wrote his songs because he lived during the reign of Sima Zhao, in constant fear that some catastrophe might befall him. Ruan Ji personally served a dynasty in disorder and was in constant fear of being slandered and meeting disaster. That is why he expressed himself in song, and that is why each time he sighs, lamenting his life, although his aim is to criticize and reprimand, his style is full of obscurities. Many centuries later, it will be difficult to fathom his true intentions. Therefore I have explained the main ideas in these verses in a general way and touch on their hidden meanings." [24]

Ruan Ji once more was forced into political life in 252 when he would serve as secretary to the successor of Sima Yi, Sima Shi. [25] Sima Shi met resistance from loyal Cao supporters such as Jiang Ji, Li Feng and Xiahou Xuan; all men who were executed after attempting to take Sima Shi's life. [26] Not long after this the Emperor of Wei would be deposed, and Sima Shi desired to place a new Emperor on the throne. The Empress Dowager Ming-Yuan interjected and nominated the young but bright Cao Mao for the position. [27] Zhong Hui, serving under Sima Shi, was once asked what kind of man Cao Mao was, and he remarked "As genius as Cao Zhi, as Martial as Cao Cao". [28]

The deposal of Cao Fang is when Ruan Ji's next poem comes into play. It is entitled Shou-yangshan. [29] The poem begins with Ruan Ji as a solitary figure, chastied and hated by a crowd. His clothing presents an official, however the care he put into them is minial which reflects just how little he cares for social behaviour.[30]

Sima Shi would pass away in 255 after Guanqiu Jian and Wen Qin rose in revolt in Shouchun, claiming to have an edict from the Empress Dowager to remove him. [31] Officially this edict is decried as a forgery [32] but it may have been real given Guanqiu Jian's connections to the Imperial house. Regardless Sima Shi's younger brother, Sima Zhao succeeded him. Zhao was very fond of Ruan Ji and took him on as a personal adviser similar to Yi and Shi in the past. [33]

Sima Zhao is said to want to give him "whatever he desired", and Ruan Ji stated that he wished to become Governor of Dongping as he once traveled there and enjoyed the customs. Sima Zhao was pleased with this and made him governor. Ruan Ji immediately saddled up his donkey and left. Once he arrived the destroyed all the walls of the official bereuas. The idea behind this was so no one could scheme in private. After 10 days he got on his donkey and left. [34] There is some doubt to this story as it is... rather unique. However there is some historical validity to it. Namely his funeral inscription cites him as Governor of Dongping, and he left two fu's, or rhapsodies, describing Dongping in detail. However, hilariously, these fu describe just how much he absolutely hated the region. [35] I have to admit, it's hard not to laugh while reading this...

"I once travelled to K'ang-fu, and when I climbed its ramparts I was filled
with melancholy. I recorded my feelings in a fu that is meant to show that K'ang-fu is not a pleasant place to be:

K'ang-fu is at the very limit of the Nine Provinces,
A somber ruin left by former dynasties.
That is why its inner and outer walls are low and narrow,
Rickety, cramped and short.
In its fields, filth gradually settles out of the water and then mixes together with the wet mud.
A square moat around it is full of dripping waters.
Only vile vegetables grow there, and most of them are indeed inedible.
The land is low and heavy with cold yin, its vital breath untempered by warm yang.
The sun does not make his full rounds there so that the plants do not mature.
That is why the people are obstinate and insincere blockheads,
Morons impossible to civilize.
The frontiers of the region are cut off and choked up, hemmed in close by deep, water-filled abysses.
The stupid population is related to its origins; The causes are related to their effects,
From former times until today,
Throughout the ages, year after year.
Chii-yeh [swamp] has stagnated behind [K'ang-fu]
And the remote Chi River has covered all before it.
The irrigation canals have not flowed freely
So that dirt and slime have accumulated in great quantity.
Unworthy men have flocked here in droves
So that there are no sages within their rooms.
And therefore the people let themselves go in disorder hide in prairies and dwell in swamps, living the life of deer, with the ambitions of porcupines.
This being the case, they do not plough the earth of their plains,
And their plantations are few and far between.
Poke weeds and reeds fill the marshes
Where mosquitoes and gnats afflict the skin.
The difficult passes in the distance are Chin-hsiang in the west and Kao-p'ing in the east.
The hills there are high and precipitous the torrents deep and obscure.
Good creatures dwell not there
Where bears and tigers live.
Therefore the people suffer their bites and are themselves like beasts or birds the passes near at hand are
Ming-chiu covering the front and Ch'u-ch'eng, open at the back.
Owls swoop there in flocks and foxes are without number.
Therefore its people are like wolves or wild dogs in temperament, strike out at others like lightning and show no kindness.
To the south one looks off toward Ch'un-shen and to the east one sees Meng Ch'ang.
One limit of the region is the city on the Hsueh and one frontier is Shan-yang.
In the inns and taverns thieves are hidden.
Towards the north, P'ing-lu is near, a western border of Ch'i.
There are short cuts to Yen and to Chao where the thieves may escape to sport at ease.
Therefore the people are secretive and one-sided sissembling and partial.
Full of egotism and deceit, giving themselves over to cruel evilness, they have set up no civilizing ritual or justice, nor are they united in a pure moral transformation.
Former sages have told us that there are places that can be enlightened while others remain benighted.
How now, man of Goodness, could you loiter in this land?" [36]

So that wasn't exactly a flattering depiction of Dongping or it's people. Ruan Ji's work is often conscidered satirical and with hidden messages, so could this so overly anti-Dongping poem be as obvious as it was, or is it douncing a group of politicins? Donald Holzman belives that, if this is the case, Ruan Ji hid it so well that it's impossible to tell. [37]

At an unspecified time Ruan Ji would be the target of attempted slander by Zhong Hui. Zhong Hui questioned himseveral times and sent spies, trying to find any possible way to slander him. Ruan Ji, however, would simply drink himself into a stuper to avoid him. [38] This isn't the only story related to Ruan Ji's drunkenness either. Sima Zhao, still adoring Ruan Ji, desired to wed his son Sima Yan to Ruan Ji's daughter. Perhaps in a protest against usurption, Ruan Ji drank heavily for 60 days in order to dissuade Sima Zhao from trying to speak with him. [39] There also is a story that revolves around him desiring to become Colonel in the infantry. It was an empty post and he had heard there was a wonderful wine and the intendant was often brewing. Once he attained the post the spent his days drinking and doing nothing else. [40]

Another story also tells of the death of his mother. Ruan Ji was playing a game of weiqi, however his opponent begged him to stop and to mourn his mother, Ruan Ji would not listen. When the game had ended he proceeded to drink three full cups of wine, soon he cried out loud and spit out a large quality of blood. [41] At the funeral his 'un-filial' actions would again show as he only whailed once for his mother. [42] Following this Ruan ji proceeded to do as he always did, drink, eat and write. Pei Kai was a fmous politician, though young at the time, payed a visit to Ruan Ji after the death of his mother, desiring to pay his condolences. When Ruan Ji left his position of mourning he was dancing and singing loudly as if no one was there. Pei Kai cried and lamented this and left not long after. Pei Kai would call Ruan Ji a man "beyond the bounds" and he does not respect rituals or regulations, not any customs. [43] A final story revolves around a visit from Ji Kang, another one of the 'Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove'. It is said that Ji Kang came with food and wine during the mourning period for his mother and they wasted away their days together as such, which they were both heavily critisized for this. [44]

His hatred for customs was well known by many. There is a story revolving around a neighbor of his, a virgin girl who passed away. Ruan Ji did not know her, nor was he related to her in any way. However he went to her funeral and wept, crying as if she were his mother. He lamented that her talent and beauty were taken from the world before they could be embraced by the world. [45]

Ruan Ji, along with Wang Chen and Xun Yi, was one of the compilers of the Weishu which is a primary source drawn on by Chen Shou for the Sanguozhi. [46]

Strangely, in 263, Ruan Ji would become rather prominent in the court. This seemingly comes out of nowhere and as Sima Zhao was offered the title of Duke Ruan Ji was designated as being the one who would prepare the request for Sima Zhao to take the ritual of Nine Distinctions. [47] The Minister of Works, Wang Xiang, sent a messenger to Ruan Ji to order him to do so. Ruan Ji had been drunk at the time, and the messenger propped him up, writing down the memorial on a wooden tablet and gave it to the messenger. The people thought his writing was done with a divine brush. [48]

"Their successors include innumerable men of feeble achievement who reaped handsome rewards. How much more should Ssu-ma Chao be honored, since he was the scion of a family who had for generations helped the Wei house keep the peace. He had himself aided in the pacifying of the troubled kingdom and would soon be able to conquer Wu and Shu! When he has done that China will again be unified and peaceful; Great Wei's virtue will be more brilliant than that of Yao and Shun; and Ssu-ma Chao's achievements will surpass those of the most famous loyal servants of the house of Chou. Then he can go to some azure beach and take leave of Chih-po or ascend Chi Mountain and bow to Hsii-yu. Would this not be splendid? Then he would be perfectly just, perfectly impartial. Who could be his neighbour? What need has he of these earnest, petty refusals?Then he can go to some azure beach and take leave of Chih-po or ascend Chi Mountain and bow to Hsii-yu. Would this not be splendid? Then he would be perfectly just, perfectly impartial. Who could be his neighbour? What need has he of these earnest, petty refusals?" [49]

Why would Ruan Ji suddenly agree to do this? Well as previously said, Ruan Ji had been drunk at the time. It's also rather humurous when one reads between the lines and consciders the climate at the time. He urges Sima Zhao to retire from political life and become a hermit. Donald Holzman also references how toxic the climate to Luoyang had been at the end of 263, citing the famous chengyu "Even a commoner on the streets knows Sima Zishang's ambitions.", and states that a satirical piece like this was the last thing Ruan Ji could do to preserve his integrity, along his and the life of his family. [50] Others believe this may be Ruan Ji truly having a change of mind and putting his faith fully in the Sima. [51]

Ruan Ji passed away not long after the memorial was made in 263 during the winter [52], though given that the letter was also drafted during the same time it's entirily possible he died in 264.

And thus ends the story of Ruan Ji. I have to be honest that I left some things out, most philosophy and stories related to all the Sages. These were things I am not well read on at all and decided to leave out as to avoid misinformation on the subject. However they were not needed to tell the full story around this interesting man. He has been used as a weapon between those who endores the Sima and those who support the Cao, building him up as a loyalist to either one. Much of Ruan Ji's wording was certainly critical of the Sima regime, but he was holding all of his positions under them and he seemed close with Sima Zhao, though he didn't want to wed his daughter to his heir. A rather odd choice. Does this reflect his loyalties to Wei? Or does he simply not want his daughter trapped in the turmoils of the court? We can never know. Ruan Ji himself seemed to loath the idea of govornment in itself. I must admit that reading over all the information presented and the varying bias points of view are rather... headache inducing. Truthfully I feel this may be one of my weakest pieces, however I wished to give Ruan Ji his story. I wanted people to see his fascinating this man was. He spent 10 days in Dongping, decried his hatred for the people, the area and destroyed office buildings. His poetry on it may have been directed more specifically to people, but regardless he wrote it and simply left on a donkey. Who does that? Who requests a post, travels there, destroys a building, writing scathing poetry and then leaves 10 days later on a doneky? Ruan Ji. That is who.


[1] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[2] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[3] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[4] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[5] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[6] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[7] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[8] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[9] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[10] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[11] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[12] De Gruyter, Stephen Owen and Wendy Swartz, The Poetry of Ruan Ji and Xi Kang - This is a very hostile work toward the Cao, and exceptionally in favor of the Sima. It includes a few rather blatent lies such as the Cao "provoking no loyalty", however how can this possibly be when men like Guanqiu Jian rose up in the name of the Empress Dowager against the Sima? Wang Jing remained loyal to Cao Mao? Wang Ling rising up to place a more capable Cao on the throne over the obvious puppet in Cao Fang? Even Sima Yi's own brother Sima Fu was loyal to the Cao till his final words. These are just hostile words, nothing more.
[13] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263 - Donald Holzman incorrectly identifies Jiang Ji as Grand General (da jiangjun ???), however he was serving as Grand Commandant (taiwei ??) at this time.
[14] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[15] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[16] Achilles Fang, Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[17] Achilles Fang, Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[18] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[19] Achilles Fang, Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[20] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[21] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263 - I've chosen to omit the poem as the essence is told in the preface to it.
[22] Fang Xuanling, Sima Yi's Jinshu biography
[23] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[24] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[25] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[26] Achilles Fang, Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[27] Chen Shou, Cao Mao's Sanguozhi biogragphy
[28] Chen Shou, Cao Mao's Sanguozhi biogragphy
[29] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[30] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[31] William Gordon Crowell, Robert Joe Cutter, Chen Shou, Pei Songzhi, Empresses and Consorts: Selections from Chen Shou's Records of the Three States with Pei Songzhi's Commentary
[32] William Gordon Crowell, Robert Joe Cutter, Chen Shou, Pei Songzhi, Empresses and Consorts: Selections from Chen Shou's Records of the Three States with Pei Songzhi's Commentary
[33] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[34] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[35] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[36] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263 - Apologies for this being in Wade-Giles, however the WG-Pinyin converstion chart I have does not have some of these Wade-Giles for converstion. I truly hate Wade-Giles a lot.
[37] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[38] Fornandan, Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[39] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[40] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[41] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[42] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[43] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[44] Fang Xuanling, Ruan Ji's Jinshu biography
[45] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[46] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[47] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[48] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[49] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[50] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
[51] De Gruyter, Stephen Owen and Wendy Swartz, The Poetry of Ruan Ji and Xi Kang
[52] Donald Holzman, Poetry and Poltics: The Life and Works of Juan Chi, A.D. 210-263
Last edited by DaoLunOfShiji on Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
"I take Heaven and Earth to be my dwelling, and my rooms are my coat and pants; so what are you gentlemen doing in my pants?"
User avatar
DaoLunOfShiji
Academic
 
Posts: 193
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:26 pm
Location: "A genius like Cao Zhi, as martial as Cao Cao."

Re: Comprehensive Biography for Ruan Ji

Unread postby Dong Zhou » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:14 am

You might have note 11 and 12 mixed up?

Very intresting, the poetry, his clear love of Dongping (I bet they use that on tourist boards) and learning about the efforts to stay out of the politics of his time and possibly remain Wei loyal
“You, are a rebellious son who abandoned his father. You are a cruel brigand who murdered his lord. How can Heaven and Earth put up with you for long? And unless you die soon, how can you face the sight of men?”
User avatar
Dong Zhou
A-Dou
A-Dou
 
Posts: 15928
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: "Now we must die. May Your Majesty maintain yourself"

Re: Comprehensive Biography for Ruan Ji

Unread postby DaoLunOfShiji » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:26 am

You're absolutely right, I did get them mixed up! Thanks for noticing that.
"I take Heaven and Earth to be my dwelling, and my rooms are my coat and pants; so what are you gentlemen doing in my pants?"
User avatar
DaoLunOfShiji
Academic
 
Posts: 193
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:26 pm
Location: "A genius like Cao Zhi, as martial as Cao Cao."


Return to Sanguo Yanyi Symposium

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 4 guests

Copyright © 2002–2008 Kongming’s Archives. All Rights Reserved