Comprehensive Biography for Lü Meng

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Comprehensive Biography for Lü Meng

Unread postby DaoLunOfShiji » Fri May 11, 2018 10:06 am

Lü Meng, Ziming (178-219)

Lü Meng was born in 178, hailing from Fupu county in Runan commendery. Around 195 his family followed his brother-in-law, Deng Dang, south to join Sun Ce. [1] Deng Dang served in a campaign against the Shanyue tribe and little did he realized that a 15 year old Lü Meng had joined him. He was shocked by this when he found out, but he was unable to stop him from going. [2] He spoke to Lü Meng's mother about this and she was furious and aimed to punish him, however Lü Meng told her

“One cannot stay poor forever. But if by chance I gain merit and honour in something, fortune and prestige would come. As they say, ‘if you don’t go deep into the tiger’s den, how can you hope to catch a tiger cub?’” [3]

His words were enough to convince his mother of his position, and she allowed him to go. However Lü Meng had a run in with an officer under Deng Dang who treated Lü Meng poorly due to his youth. [4] He spoke with Deng Dang,

“What can this nestling do? [Having him in the army] is no different than having a piece of meat around to feed a tiger with.” [5]

On a seperate day they ran into one another again and the man insulted Lü Meng once more. Lü Meng became furious, took out his sword and killed the officer. [6]

Must I stress this, killing for petty reasons is bad. Regardless of who does it. Thankfully this isn't something Lü Meng would repeat.

After the incident he fled to the home of Zheng Zhang in his home village seeking refuge. [7] Eventually he would meet with Yuan Xiong, a colonel in the army, and Yuan told Sun Ce about this. Ce and Meng met and Ce was very impressed by the young man before him, so he pardoned the teenager and enlisted him as a personal attendant. [8]

In 199 Deng Dang passed away and Lü Meng took over his command, now appointed to senior major in the army of Sun Ce on the recommendation of Zhang Zhao. [9] Sun Ce passed away in 200 after an altercation with men from the deceased Xu Gong [10] and was succeeded by his younger brother Sun Quan, [11] he had the desire to merge the smaller units together as to create large forces for with to campaign with. Lü Meng, taking out a loan, bought equipment for his men and dressed then in red uniforms, bound leggings and held practice session for them to show their craft. When Sun Quan saw this he was greatly impressed and placed a large force under Lü Meng's command. [12]

In 203 Sun Quan sent his forces west to attacking Huang Zu, under Liu Biao. The Southlands army destroyed the fleet, however they were not able to overcome him as a rebellion in Danyang sprung up. [13] Lü Meng, along with Taishi Ci, Huang Gai, Han Dang and Zhou Tai were sent against the Shanyue and defeated the tribesman. [14] Lü Meng performed admirably and was promoted to Colonel Who Pacifies the North and made a magistrate. [15]

In 208 Sun Quan marched west once against to attack Huang Zu. [16] Huang Zu's army was intitially defeated and Ling Cao, father to Ling Tong, chased after the fleeing army. While in persuit, Gan Ning who lead the rear guard for Huang Zu, turned and shot Ling Cao, killing him and alowing Huang Zu to flee. Huang Zu and Gan Ning had a falling out, and thanks to Su Fei, Gan Ning was able to flee to Sun Quan. Zhou Yu and Lü Meng both spoke in favor of recruiting Gan Ning, and Sun Quan treated him very well. [17]

Once more Sun Quan attacked Huang Zu in the west. In response he sent two specialized boats covered in oxen hide to cover the river, as well as a great rope with anchors attatched to it and a cover of over a thousand crossbows to protect it all. [18] Dong Xi and Ling Tong attacked and boarded the ships. Dong Xi personally kept the ropes which caused the ships to be swept down the river, allowing the Southlands forces to move unopposed. [19] With his defences shattered Huang Zu ordered his Chief Naval Officer Chen Jiu to lead the navy against Sun Quan. Lü Meng, the Chief Commandant Who Pacifies the North, lead the vanguard himself and crushed the enemy navy; personally cutting off Chen Jiu's head. Hearing of this, Huang Zu fled. [20] Ling Tong and Dong Xi struck Xiakou and took the city, taking tens of thousands captive. [21] Huang Zu was killed and his head taken.[22]

For his efforts in the campaign Lü Meng was promoted to General of the Interior Who Crosses the Fields and ten million cash. [23] That's a f••• load of money... and it will come up again later. Trust me on that one friends.

Lü Meng was later apart of the famous battle at Red Cliff, otherwise known as Chibi. [24] Cao Cao's forces were hit by a sickness and their attacks were being held off by the Wu army. Huang Gai proposed that since the northern ships are chained together, it would be wise to burn them. With the favor of a southeastern wind, Huang Gai took 10 covered ships and filled them with flammable materials and then sent a letter to Cao Cao feigning surrender. On the front of the wind the Wu fire ships were pushed toward the Cao fleet, which caught everyone's attention. The soldiers were shocked and excited, Huang Gai had come to surrender! However the ships crashed together into Cao Cao's fleet and they caught fire. The wind spread the flames and the entire fleed burned. Huang Gai had turned the Yangtze into a river of flame. [25] The Wu army, including Lü Meng, launched a successful raid on Cao Cao's camp at Wulin and won a glorious victory for the Southlands. [26]

Lü Meng followed Zhou Yu on his campaign in Jingzhou. The Southlands army besieged Nanjun, defended by Cao Ren. [27] A general from Yizhou by the name of Xi Su defected to Sun Quan's army, Zhou Yu sent a petition to Sun Quan that his soldier's be added to Lü Meng's command. Lü Meng, however, protested this and said to Zhou Yu that Xu Si was a courageous person, and that it would be proper to bestow rewards on someone who had come so far, not punish them. Zhou Yu agreed with his words and Xi Su retained his command. Lü Meng would employ the similar method later when the generals Cheng Dang, Song Ding and Xu Gu had all died. Sun Quan ordered their soldiers be reassigned to Lü Meng, however Meng declined and stated that since those men all had families and gave their lives to the state, their command should not be given away. He petitioned Sun Quan multiple times until he relented. Lü Meng took the three under his wing and tought them personally. [28]

Gan Ning was sent ahead to Yiling to garrison the city, but he was soon besieged by Cao Ren and the Southlands army was in dire straits. The many generals feared they couldn't separate their army to save him, however Lü Meng said that Ling Tong could be left behind for 10 days, giving them time to save Yiling without losing their current position. He also requested that a small amount of soldiers be sent back to block a road with downed tree branches, that way they would be able to seize the horses of the fleeing army. [29]

The Southlands army marched upon Yiling and the Cao forces were defeated, with half their army killed. The enemies fled in the night and due to Lü Meng's plan, abandoned three hundred horses which the soldiers of Sun Quan captured. [30]

Zhou Yu built a fortress on the opposite side of the river, and Cao Ren would retreat after. They occupied Nanjun and Jingzhou. Lü Meng was appointed Lieutenant-General and made a magistrate of Xunyang. [31] A strategic loction along the Yangtze. [32]

Sun Quan had taken Lü Meng and Jiang Qin aside, two men of importance and abudant talented, and he instructed the two of them read and study in order to better themselves. Lü Meng questioned this, citing that the times are far too troubling to spend their days reading, which Sun Quan retorted Lü Meng couldn't be busier than he was, but he had studied the Three Histories as well as countless military classics. He suggested they read Sun Tzu's work, the Six Stratagems, Zuo Chronicles, Tales of the States and the Three Histories. The two of them followed these instructions and studied religiously. Lü Meng never tired of his efforts, and it's noted that his studied exceeded that of life-long scholars. [33]

After Zhou Yu has passed away in 210 due to illness Lu Su was the one to succeed him. [34] At the time he did not look highly upon Lü Meng, which many in his ranks protested. They told Lu Su that Meng had earned honor and distinction on a daily basis, and that Lu Su should pay him respect. So while on his way to Lukou, Lu Su stopped by to visit Lü Meng. They held a large banquet, and wine was shared by all [35] Lü Meng asked Lu Su,

"Sir, you have now been entrusted witht he grave responsibility to be neighbours with Guan Yu. What sort of strategies do you have in mind, just in case of the unexpected?"

Lu Su responded carelessly that he would do whatever the situation calls for [36], to which Lü Meng called him out on,

"Although East and West are one family now, Guan Yu is in rality like a bear anda tiger. How can plans not be prepared ahead of time?"

He then went ahead and presented five grand strategies for dealing with Guan Yu should the time come, to which Lu Su was greatly pleased at. He praised his ability and mind, showed his respects to Lü Meng's mother and the two left on very positive terms. [37]

Sun Quan was trilled with their improvements over the years. He's noted as saying that none can match Lü Meng and Jiang Qin. They were humble, virtuous and brilliant, and to have them as core officers is the greatest gift a ruler could ask for. [38]

A commander of Cao Cao's named Xie Qi had been raiding Wu's territory for some time, and in 211 he came to blows with Lü Meng who defeated him. Several officers surrendered along with their families as a result. [39]

The capital of Sun Quan and the Southlands was, at the time, Jianye which was close to the Yangtze river. [40] Being rather close to Cao Cao's territory, though obviously having the boundry of the river for extra defence, Sun Quan did focus on fortifying the city. While doing so, he also constructed a naval fortress upstream named Ruxu. Lü Meng had been the one to advise him to construct this fort which earned the doubt of many in Sun Quan's rank. They questioned the use to which Lü Meng replied to them that no one could ever be certain of success in every battle, and if they needed a swift retreat, a land abased defence would protect the men and ships. He was able to convince the doubters with these arguments, and so the base was constructed around 62 miles south of the famous Hefei.[41]

Lü Meng advised Sun Quan that when Cao Cao marches south to Ruxu, you must not engage him. Hold the defenses firm, and that is just what happened in 213. Lü Meng held the lines against Cao Cao for around a month until the seasonal flooding forced the Northern army to retreat. [42]

Cao Cao sent his general Zhu Guang to a formidable fort at Wan and focus on expanding farm lands, as well as spies to work with the local bandits to have them aid the north in fighting the Southlands. [43] All the generals urged Sun Quan to created earthen mounds and use large siege weaponry to deal with Wan, however Lü Meng interjected.[44]

"If we want to make siege weaponry and earth mounds, it would take us many days. By that time, the city defences would have been raised and outside help arrived. Then it would be too late for us. Furthermore, we have come here taking advantage of the high water level of the river, and if we stay here too long the water level would drop and retreat would be difficult. I am very worried about that. My view of this city is that it can't be very well-defended. So if we besiege it now, attacking from all sides in full morale, we can take it in no time at all. After that, we can treteat back on the waters. This is the way of success." [45]

Furthermore, Lü Meng suggested that Gan Ning lead the vanguard to storm the city walls while he personally lead an elite army to back him up. [46] The army attacked, Lü Meng personally beating the drums to inspire the men, and the city was seized with ease. Zhang Liao was sent as reinforcements but he was too late and withdrew after news of the cities capture. [47] Lü Meng was named Grand Administrator of Lujiang and the captured soldiers were put directly under his command, as well as men from the colony in Xunyang he was a magistrate of. [48]

While returning to Xunyang there was a bandit rebellion that rose up, but none were successful in defeating them. Sun Quan declared that 100 ferocious birds cannot match an osprey (one of the most respected birds in Chinese culture), and Lü Meng was sent to fight them. Not long after arriving Lü Meng killed the leader and the rest surrendered. He spared their lives and set them free. [49]

By the end of 214 things had settled down for the Southlands. Much territory was pacified and Cao Cao had been defeated at Ruxu, stopping any further mass incursions under his command. His attention was focused westward against Liangzhou and Hanzhong, meanwhile Liu Bei had seized Yizhou and removed a sizable portion of his army from Jingzhou, leaving Guan Yu behind. [50]

In the beginning months of 215 Sun Quan, through the use of Zhuge Jin, asked that the commanderies of Jingzhou be returned to Sun Quan now that he had taken the riverlands. Liu Bei, however, had no intention of returning the lands to Sun Quan, though he would spin a lie in an attempt to stave off any advances from Sun Quan. [51] The bandit said that he would return Jingzhou once all the lands of Liangzou were in his control. Sun Quan, not being a moron, did not believe any of this. Famously, he remarked "This is borrowing and not returning." [52] Sun Quan ordered several officials to take over Changsha, Lingling and Guiyang in Jingzhou, however Guan Yu refused to allow these men into their post, so Sun Quan put Lü Meng at the head of 20,000 soldiers and sent him to Jingzhou. [53]

Two of the commanderies immediately surrendered upon Lü Meng's request, however the Grand Administrator of Lingling, Hao Pu, refused to betray Liu Bei. Guan u then lead his army south to fight for Jingzhou, to which Sun Quan sent Lu Su with 10,000 soldiers to hold him at Yiyang. Sun Quan recalled Lü Meng at once to deal with with Guan Yu. [54]

Before Lü Mengleft, however, he passed by Lingcheng where he met Deng Xuanzhi, a friend of Hao Pu. When he recieved the summons from Sun Quan he kept it hidden, and then ordered hismen to attack the city in the morning. [55] Deng Xuanzhi retorted that Hao Pi is a loyal and righteous man, but he does not understand the times. He is hoping against hope for help that won't come. Lü Meng compared him to a fish in a dry pond praying for rain. [56] Lü Meng then sent Deng Xuanzhi to see Hao Pu and told him that Lü Meng said it would certainly be tragic for him to lose his life, as well as that of his mother when the city falls. [57] Kind of like a mobster movie. Hao Pu surrendered and Lü Meng ordered his men to seize all the gates and beckoned Hao Pu to him. When he arrived, Lü Meng presented the letter and he realized that Liu Bei was in fact in Gongan and Guan Yu was at Yiyang, and help actually was not far away. He felt mortally ashamed. [58]

Lingling did not remain in Sun Quan's hands though, as he struck up a peace treaty with Liu Bei to cease hostility and returned it, however everything else they had taken they would keep. [59]

In the summer of 215 Sun Quan launched an expedition north to attack the city of Hefei. [60] Sun Quan's army reportedly numbered around 100,000 soldiers, while the defenders under Zhang Liao only had 7,000. [61] Despite a seemingly overwhelming advantage, the Wu army met with disaster as on the first day Zhang Liao charged directly into the formation of the Southlands army. Two general were beheaded, dozens were personally slain by him and as he shouted his own name, he charged toward Sun Quan's banner. Quan, fearing for his life, retreated to higher ground and had his guards encircle him with raised halberds. Zhang Liao taunted Sun Quan from his position, but Quan was too afraid to move. However after noticing the small number of soldiers that followed Zhang Liao, the Southlands army began to surround him in many rows in order to kill him. Zhang Liao charged through the formation and escaped with some men, however there were still those trapped inside, screaming that they were forsaken by their general. Zhang Liao, however, proceeded to charge back into the Southlands ranks and save the remaining men. The army of Sun Quan was scattered and decimated, allowed Cao Cao's forces to withdraw into the city. Sun Quan's army, with destroyed morale and hit by a plague, besieged the city for 10 days but could not over come them. The Southlands army retreated but Zhang Liao pursued and cut down hundreds of them. [62] Lü Meng and Ling Tong served in the rear guard and did their best to hold off the pursuing northern army. [63] The army was able to escape, however Ling Tong was heavily wounded in the fighting though he survived. [64]

Hefei was an absolute disaster for the Sun forces. Many generals, including He Qi, pleaded with Sun Quan to be more careful as he nearly lost his life at the hands of Zhang Liao. [65]

In 217 Cao Cao brought his army south to once more challenge Sun Quan. Yet again their battlefield was to be at Ruxu. [66] Rafe de Crespigny notes that perhaps Sun Quan was still shaken by his loss, and so command was turned over to Lü Meng and Jiang Qin. [67] Cao Cao launched his attack however Lü Meng and Jiang Qin defeated him both on land and at sea, despite the Southlands navy being damaged heavily in a storm. [68]Lü Meng's forces crushed the vanguard of Cao Cao before they were able to make camp. Ruxu was a massive blunder for Cao Cao and he retreated. Lü Meng was appointed to Keeper of the Left Army and General of Tiger Might. [69]

With the death of Lu Su, Lü Meng was given command of his forces, and Sun Quan appointed him to Grand Administrator of Hanchang, thus putting him right on the border with Guan Yu. [70] Lü Meng knew Guan Yu's character. Meng saw that Guan Yu had designed on Jingzhou, and that since he was upstream, it would give him a direct access to the Southlands via a naval route. [71] In public Lü Meng showed a friendly face to Guan Yu and stated he had every intent on honoring Lu Su's policies. [72] In secret Lü Meng sent a petition to Sun Quan, stating that Guan Yu must be dealt with at once. He requested Sun Jiao be sent to Nanjun, Pan Zhang to Baidi, Jiang Qi to lead 10,000 men to patrol along the river, all to allow Lü Meng to push against Xiangyang. This would rid Jingzhou of Cao Cao's presence, thus neutralizing Guan Yu's need to be there to honor Lu Su's plan of an Alliance in Jingzhou. He also states that Guan Yu and Liu Bei are noted traitors in the past and they cannot be relied on. He sites the only reason Guan Yu hasn't marched on them was due to Sun Quan's brilliance, and the fact that Lü Meng, Jiang Qin, Gan Ning, etc. were still very much alive. Once they were gone Guan Yu would march and easily take over the Southlands. [73] Sun Quan agreed with everything that was said, but then brought up the idea of seizing Xuzhou. Lü Meng retorted that it would be easy to take the region, however the ground is excellent for cavalry and when Sun Quan marches there Cao Cao will respond in full force, and even a host of 80,000 would be trouble. He states taking down Guan Yu and seizing Jingzhou is the right call. Sun Quan agreed. [74]

In 219 Guan Yu attacked Fancheng, guarded by Cao Ren. He left a sizable force behind, and Lü Meng states that he must fear an eventual attack from Lü Meng. He states that he should be recalled as his illness is well known to many. Once Guan Yu hears of this he will be at ease and call up his reserves. That way Jingzhou can be taken swiftly and so can Guan Yu. Sun Quan agreed and word spread that Lü Meng had fallen deathly ill, to which Guan Yu believed and did exactly as Lü Meng anticipated. [75] Lu Xun would effectively take over which would ease Guan Yu as he was someone Guan Yu would not know of. He also sent a flattering letter to Guan Yu, praising his bravery and glory, stating that he admired him. Everyone had been praising his name after his defeat of Yu Jin and states that even legends of old are no match for him. [77] Due to a flooding of the nearby rivers, Guan Yu saw immense success as he killed Pang De and captured Yu Jin. Guan Yu, claiming to be short on supplies, raiding Wu's store house at Xiangguan. When Sun Quan heard the news he mobilized his army at once and put Lü Meng at the head of it and ordered him to attack at once. [78] Sun Quan sent a letter to Cao Cao stating his intentions, to which Cao Cao sent it to Guan Yu who, in his arrogance, thought it was some cheap ploy and did not believe it. [79]

In December of 219, the Southlands army marched west into Jingzhou. Jiang Qin led the flee along the Han, Sun Jiao was to act as reserves and Lü Meng led the main attack. He moved from Xunyang, upstream along the Yangtze with nearly all of his soldiers hidden in ships. The visible men were dressed as merchants and traders. They took all of Guan Yu's outposts by surprise, thus allowing them to remain undetected while they approached Gongan and Jiangling. [80] When the main force arrived at Gongan, the commander Shi Ren who had a poor relationship with Guan Yu, was convinced to defect due to Yu Fan. Shi Ren then followed them to Jiangling where they were able to get the commander Mi Fang, brother-in-law to Liu Bei, to also defect. [81]

In one single master stroke of genius planning and execution Lü Meng seized the entirety of Jingzhou out from under Guan Yu without him even realizing what had happened.

Guan Yu gave up his assault on Fancheng and returned south. Cao Cao did not pursue as he desired to let the two armies fight it out. [82] Lü Meng had seized Guan Yu's capital which just so happened to hold his treasury as well as the families of most of his soldiers. Lü Meng stated that Jingzhou truly belong to Sun Quan and they took it with very minimal blood shed. What they were doing was righteous. To the soldiers, Lü Meng offered what Guan Yu could never give. Companionship, compassion and security. Lü Meng imposed harsh punishments on any who looted. [83] A man from his home commendary violated these laws, and with tears in his eyes, Lü Meng took his head to show he was serious. Lü Meng gave out medicine, food and clothing to those who need it, tending to the elderly and the sick. [84]

When Guan Yu arrived at Jiangling, Lü Meng sent a messenger that stated all the men in Guan Yu's army may freely see their families without any interference from him. These men did so, and they reported back that Lü Meng was extremely generous, and knew there was nothing to gain from fighitng. These were not going to endanger their families lives by attacking their homes all for the bruise ego of a mad man with a beard, and so they surrendered to Lü Meng on mass. [85]

In secret Lü Meng had ordered Lu Xun travel up the stream and cut off any support Guan Yu may receive from Yizhou by taking Yidu, Zigui and Fangling. The local tribes were offered rewards if they joined, and so they did. Guan Yu was entirily isolated in Danyang by Sun Quan and Cao Cao. [86] Guan Yu fled to Maicheng and along the way even more soldiers disserted him until all he had was a skeleton crew of fools, and his son Ping. While they were on their way there, Zhu Ran and Pan Zhang ambushed them and captured the remaining people. Guan Yu and Guan Ping were both executed. [87] Lü Meng's plan was flawless and the only thing one can ever compare it to was Deng Ai's masterful plan on capturing Chengdu in 264.

Lü Meng was rewarded heftily, being promoted to Grand Administrator of Nanjun, Marquis of Chanling, awarded a hundred million cash and five hundreds catties of golds. Lü Meng declined everything he was given. His illness was truly taking a turn for the worse and Sun Quan decreed that any who could tree him would be awarded 1,0000 gold. There was a time when Lü Meng's health was improving and Sun Quan was overjoyed and he issued a general amnesty to all, and everyone in the realm rejoiced. However that did not last and Lü Meng's health got worse. Sun Quan visited him personally and had Daoist priests pray for him. Sadly for Lü Meng he passed away at the age of 42, leaving instructions that every reward he had ever been given, may it be cloth, gold, jade, anything; it was to be returned directly to the state. He kept it all. He also demanded he be given a simple burial with minimal expenses. When everything had been given back, Lü Meng's estate barely had enough money to pay for his funeral, which Sun Quan grieved greatly. [88]

And thus ends the story of Lü Meng, one of the most fascinating and accomplished men of the Three Kingdoms era. I truthfully do not have the words to describe the amount of respect and admiration I have for everything he did for his state. There is rarely ever a human being like Lü Meng. I firmly believe that he and Deng Ai are the pillars of this era. Two men that should be respected above all. In planning, in execution, in kindness and in learning; they were second to none. Lü Meng's accomplishments are phenomenal. Fiction labels him as an iconoclast for killing a religious figure, but history judges fairly. History see's a man who worked his ass off despite failing health the protect a state he called home. Lü Meng is a hero.


[1] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[2] Rafe de Crespigny, Biographical Dictionary of the Later Han to Three Kingdoms
[3] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[4] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[5] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[6] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[7] Rafe de Crespigny, Biographical Dictionary of the Later Han to Three Kingdoms
[8] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[9] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[10] Chen Shou, Sun Ce's Sanguozhi biography
[11] Chen Shou, Sun Quan's Sanguozhi biography
[12] Rafe de Crespigny, Biographical Dictionary of the Later Han to Three Kingdoms
[13] Rafe de Crespigny, To Establish Peace volume 2, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[14] Rafe de Crespigny, To Establish Peace volume 2, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[15] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[16] Chen Shou, Sun Quan's Sanguozhi biography
[17] Chen Shou, Gan Ning's Sanguozhi biography
[18] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the Sotuh
[19] Rafe de Crespigny, To Establish Peace volume 2, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[20] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[21] Chen Shou, Sun Quan's Sanguozhi biography
[22] Rafe de Crespigny, To Establish Peace volume 2, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[23] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[24] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[25] Rafe de Crespigny, To Establish Peace volume 2, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[26] Rafe de Crespigny, To Establish Peace volume 2, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[27] Rafe de Crespigny, To Establish Peace volume 2, Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian
[28] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[29] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[30] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[31] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[32] Rafe de Crespigny, Biographical Dictionary of the Later Han to Three Kingdoms
[33] Yu Pu, Jiang Biao Zhuan
[34] Chen Shou, Lu Su's Sanguozhi biography
[35] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[36] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[37] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[38] Yu Pu, Jiang Biao Zhuan
[39] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[40] Chen Shou, Sun Quan's Sanguozhi biography
[41] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[42] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[43] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[44] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[45] Hu Chong, Wuli
[46] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[47] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[48] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[49] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[50] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[51] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[52] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[53] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[54] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[55] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[56] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[57] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[58] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[59] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[60] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[61] Chen Shou, Zhang Liao's Sanguozhi biography
[62] Chen Shou, Zhang Liao's Sanguozhi biography
[63] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[64] Chen Shou, Ling Tong's Sanguozhi biography
[65] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[66] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[67] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[68] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[69] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[70] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[71] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[72] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[73] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[74] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[75] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[76] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[77] Chen Shou, Lu Xun's Sanguozhi biography
[78] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[79] Rafe de Crespigny, Imperial Warlord
[80] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[81] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[82] Rafe de Crespigny, Generals of the South
[83] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[84] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[85] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[86] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[87] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
[88] Chen Shou, Lu Meng's Sanguozhi biography
"I take Heaven and Earth to be my dwelling, and my rooms are my coat and pants; so what are you gentlemen doing in my pants?"
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Re: Comprehensive Biography for Lü Meng

Unread postby Sun Fin » Fri May 11, 2018 5:09 pm

Another great bio! Thanks mate! :D
Interested in the history behind the novel? Find a list of english language Three Kingdom sources here.
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Re: Comprehensive Biography for Lü Meng

Unread postby LiuBeiwasGreat » Sat May 12, 2018 12:57 am

Lu Meng was a brilliant officer of great ability. Always nice to read his bio....though I think I detect some of your own personal beliefs in the above :lol:
"If you can't drink a lobbyist's whiskey, take his money, sleep with his women and still vote against him in the morning, you don't belong in politics."
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Re: Comprehensive Biography for Lü Meng

Unread postby DaoLunOfShiji » Sat May 12, 2018 6:20 am

In my defense, I just really don't like Guan Yu! xD Believe it or not, that's the tame version of what that could've been. Trying to be -slightly- more professional, however there are certain biases I just can't hide. :D
"I take Heaven and Earth to be my dwelling, and my rooms are my coat and pants; so what are you gentlemen doing in my pants?"
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Re: Comprehensive Biography for Lü Meng

Unread postby greencactaur » Tue May 15, 2018 12:57 am

Lu Meng is a great hero of the era. I am really curious as to what would be if he had lived longer.
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