Hair and facial hair?

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Re: Hair and facial hair?

Unread postby Aaron.K » Mon Jan 16, 2017 8:10 pm

For the most part yeah, men would've had whispy facial hair if they had any at all. Few likely had any, unless they had some kind of Uyghur ancestors really.
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Re: Hair and facial hair?

Unread postby CaTigeReptile » Thu Feb 02, 2017 1:27 am

Funny you should mention this!

I too had just looked this up recently, having forgotten that I myself had apparently engaged in a thread about this 10 years ago. There's actually some decent info in there, in fact a very good last post -- and all sorts of embarrassing ten-year-old conversations to blackmail me each other with :wink: In terms of accuracy of info, it gets better as the thread goes on.

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=17857

My two cents is that looking at ancient Chinese art is a good way to judge. The last post there has some comparisons of facial hair. While not all Asian men have a lot of facial hair, it's simply untrue to say that none do or did. Just google image search "Chinese man beard." That's not to brush aside any intermarriage that has occurred since almost 2000 years ago and the influence that would have on modern day Chinese facial hair, but . . . Chinese men with beards that look like the art! Most of the art from the Han Dynasty has the wispy mustache or goatee going on, but there's also some creativity. I've heard somewhere that even though the "no hair-cutting" rule applied to head-hair after your capping ceremony, that facial hair was considered okay to style-shave because it grew after puberty. As is noted in the last post of the thread above, Qin Shi Huang Di's soldiers had styled facial hair. Granted, that was before state-sponsored Confucianism. Of course, shaving ALL your hair off would be considered un-manly. Also, women shaved their eyebrows off and painted them in, so the "all hair is sacred!" thing might have been a little more selective than we think.
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Re: Hair and facial hair?

Unread postby Sun Fin » Fri Feb 03, 2017 3:00 pm

I love you! That other thread was full of helpful information! :D
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Re: Hair and facial hair?

Unread postby Aaron.K » Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:22 am

Unfortunately I think when it comes to Chinese art, a lot of that is projection. Art does not always depict an accurate image, but instead depicts an idealized image. This image for example is considered to be an accurate depiction of Yue Fei (second from the left) during the Song dynasty.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ef/Four_Generals_of_Song.jpg/1920px-Four_Generals_of_Song.jpg

Yet when you look at other artwork of him, he's tall, muscular, and has an impressive beard. Very different from this one, where he's a relatively chubby person and completely lacking a beard and any sort of heroic stature that's often given to him in other works. The individuals on this painting who do have beards have rather whispy facial hair, and the majority have none.

I'm generally inclined to think most men of the period were lacking substantial beards. That's one of the reasons why it often gets mentioned in historical accounts, because it was such a rare thing, and the people who did have long magnificent beards probably had thin whiskers in comparison to say men from Scandinavia.
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Re: Hair and facial hair?

Unread postby laojim » Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:16 pm

I think you have this correct. I would just suggest two things. First, in ancient times those who wore bears had little choice simply because the habit of drawing a sharp knife over one's face every day would have been rather risky. Those who wanted a clean shave in Europe depended on others who had developed the skill of doing the shaving without injury so giving rise to the profession of the barber. I would suppose that the barber did not become a common tradesman until the Ming when half of the head needed to be shaved. It would be interesting to find some evidence for such a supposition.

Second, you will find that in regard to the growing of beards you will find that the American Indians generally had no beards at all. I not with regard to the comments about a google search, that the images of Indians with beards are all modern images and therefore not certainly genetically "pure." One does not see any beards in the older images although that could be because of the preconceptions of the artists making the picture.
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Re: Hair and facial hair?

Unread postby Xian Xu » Fri Feb 24, 2017 12:49 am

Wait! So you're telling me the silly little mustaches that were used to show the passage of time in Three Kingdoms 2010 weren't a real representation of history!? :shock: :shock:

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Re: Hair and facial hair?

Unread postby Sun Fin » Fri Feb 24, 2017 8:15 am

Well actually according to the other thread the prohibition on shaving was just on head hair not on facial hair so some may have had them!
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