Zhuge Liang and Cao Cao?

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What if Zhuge Liang had not joined Liu Bei, but instead Cao Cao?

All China would have benefited tremendously!
7
21%
All China would have benefited somewhat.
0
No votes
Pretty decent, but after boths death, things would have played out similar.
8
24%
They would not have worked together well.
9
27%
They were to different, no good would have come of this!
8
24%
Something else... (explain in thread!)
1
3%
 
Total votes : 33

Re:

Unread postby burmaboy » Thu Mar 03, 2011 3:57 pm

Xiahou Mao wrote:
NOD wrote:in terms of military stratigest yes wei was harshly better


I'd contest that point. The historical Zhuge Liang was a superior military commander to the majority of Wei generals.

Who was better than him? Sima Yi? Sima Yi couldn't defeat Zhuge Liang openly, and while he was smart enough to use his defensive position to his advantage, that makes him capable, but not better. Zhang He? Zhuge Liang killed Zhang He. Zhang Liao? Meh, defense is always easier than offense, see Hao Zhao for another example of that. Cao Ren? Xiahou Yuan? Xu Huang? Arguments could be made for them being comparable, but I don't know that any of them are better.

If Zhuge Liang joined Cao Cao, and Cao Cao made use of his talent, Wei would certainly have done better. I don't know that they would have united the land, but at the least, Shu would have fallen much sooner than it really did.



I agree. ZGL is no match for any wei if it's one on one but too bad he chose the wrong lord :wink:
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