1786th anniversary of Cao Cao's death

Join the Romance of the Three Kingdoms discussion with our resident Scholars. Topics relating to the novel and history are both welcome. Don't forget to check the Forum Rules before posting.
Kongming’s Archives: Romance of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms Officer Biographies
Three Kingdoms Officer Encyclopedia
Scholars of Shen Zhou Search Tool

1786th anniversary of Cao Cao's death

Unread postby Lady Wu » Thu Mar 16, 2006 12:28 am

Love him or hate him, Cao Cao is unquestionably one of the most remarkable characters during the RTK era.

Post your tribute to the Martial Emperor of Wei here, on this 1786th anniversary of his passing!

Great leader and poet, rest in peace.
"Whatever you do, don't fall off the bridge! It'll be a pain to try to get back up again." - Private, DW 8
User avatar
Lady Wu
There's no better state than Wu
There's no better state than Wu
 
Posts: 12793
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2002 2:35 am
Location: Wu-ere else?

Unread postby Wo Long » Thu Mar 16, 2006 12:51 am

Wow...I feel sad now. Today is also the day that Julius Caesar was assassinated. Two of the greatest leaders and military tactitians died on the same day...how tragic!
Me Blog.
Restore the Ming Dynasty in Beijing!
User avatar
Wo Long
Scholar of Shen Zhou
 
Posts: 1414
Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2005 12:51 am

Unread postby TheRealWolfman » Thu Mar 16, 2006 1:16 am

Dang, who got the sining grape juice, no reason to mourn, lets party for him since he can't do it himself. Partay partay partay. Do the momba. Ok i guess not. But no reason to be sad. Ya know he wouldnt want that.
User avatar
TheRealWolfman
Scholar of Shen Zhou
 
Posts: 744
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2006 9:14 pm
Location: Somewhere over the irradiated rainbow.

Unread postby Liu Yuante » Thu Mar 16, 2006 1:18 am

Well Duke of Wei, if there's an afterlife then surely you know that I don't like you very much. You rewarded people of questionable moral character and punished good men who spoke out against your own self-aggrandizement. Your intolerance of corruption became an obsession and you laid waste to innocent people in the thousands because you suffered personal misfortune and grief. There is much to fault you for. Still, you were not a monster; you enjoyed literary pursuits, you brought order to chaos and your military acumen and gift for finding and using talent were both equally extraordinary.

In the end, here in the present day, it matters little either way, and your bones, long-buried in the earth at Gaoling have surely turned to dust. If nothing else, you made a mark that lingers in the imagination of the common person and the scholar alike. That will have to suffice.

Adrian
User avatar
Liu Yuante
绯红王
 
Posts: 2681
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:20 am

Unread postby Jiang Zhi » Thu Mar 16, 2006 1:52 am

Feng Ming: "Maodi, I see a falling star. Could it be...Cao Cao's star?"

Jiang Zhi: "So it ends, the Duke of Wei is no longer with us. From a mere servant under He Jin, who would have think he would one day control most of China? What great accomplishments. His flame may have burnt out but his legacy still lives on. Friend or foe, he is still one to be admired and his position is one to envy. If only I were so decisive, so intelligent, so charismatic...if only..."

^___^ hehehehe, I guess that what I'll be saying if I lived back then :D
Jiang Zhi of Foshan, style Maodi
~*!越武帝!*~ - 我愛我的妻子孫尚香!
Nan Hai, Jiaozhou

Laconius Arts and Design My Rot3K fanfiction
User avatar
Jiang Zhi
Sun Shang Xiang's puppy-eyed slave
 
Posts: 3738
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2002 3:07 am
Location: Sun Shang Xiang's bedroom

Unread postby Wo Long » Thu Mar 16, 2006 2:22 am

LiuYuanTe wrote:Well Duke of Wei, if there's an afterlife then surely you know that I don't like you very much. You rewarded people of questionable moral character and punished good men who spoke out against your own self-aggrandizement. Your intolerance of corruption became an obsession and you laid waste to innocent people in the thousands because you suffered personal misfortune and grief. There is much to fault you for. Still, you were not a monster; you enjoyed literary pursuits, you brought order to chaos and your military acumen and gift for finding and using talent were both equally extraordinary.

In the end, here in the present day, it matters little either way, and your bones, long-buried in the earth at Gaoling have surely turned to dust. If nothing else, you made a mark that lingers in the imagination of the common person and the scholar alike. That will have to suffice.

Adrian


Wow I feel cheesy. That actually made my eyes get a little watery, very touching.

Am I the only one who gets this emotional when someone who I admired, no matter how long ago they lived, dies?
Me Blog.
Restore the Ming Dynasty in Beijing!
User avatar
Wo Long
Scholar of Shen Zhou
 
Posts: 1414
Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2005 12:51 am

Unread postby urbanterrorist » Thu Mar 16, 2006 2:59 am

Beware the Ides of March!!
They miss the whisper that runs any day in your mind,
"Who are you really, wanderer?" and the answer you have to give
no matter how dark and cold the world around you is:
"Maybe I'm a king. -William Stafford
User avatar
urbanterrorist
Scholar of Shen Zhou
 
Posts: 2278
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 4:02 pm
Location: Schlachthof Fünf

Unread postby Shogun 144 » Thu Mar 16, 2006 3:24 am

Worry not Wo Long, I get teary eyed too.....

Well I do not know if I can really express myself properly but it goes....

What I can say about Duke Cao...... He was one of those men who become great through thier talents and the talents of others. Cao started off as a mere military offical in the cavalry and barely, what a decade later, and he is the leading member of the Coalition to bring down the Chacellor. This was because Cao Cao was able to tell if a person has talent, and use it propely. Cao was a great politcial man and oppertunist, because of these skills Cao was able to expand without having to fight, not to say his abilities at war where bad. Lest we forget it was the politiking and the right timing that brought Duke Cao to possess the Emperor! The Duke was great in war too, his brilliant tatical and strategical mind brought down the most powerful man in China at the time, Yuan Shao. Even after the diaster of Chi Bi Duke Cao was able to bounce back, proving to be resilient.

In internal affiars Duke Cao proved to be good too. He chose great domestic officers and as a result the North did well. Though not good engouth to weather the coming storm of the barbarians that came during the Jin.

Duke Cao did a fine job, by my estimation, of setting the foundation for the Empire of Wei during his life. I do not think that Duke Cao is to blame for the fall of his family from power later on. I believe that has more to do with the short lives of the Duke's son, Pi, and grandson, Rui.

Of course no tribute to the Duke would be complete without mentioning his poetry. Though I am not much of a poetry person I do admire the work of Duke Cao and his son Cao Zhi. He was as talented at poetry as he was at war.

The Duke did have his flaws, all men have them. In my estimation I think Duke Cao's biggest flaw was his paranoia, he would sometimes kill people for no reason other then his paranoia.

All in all I admire Duke Cao. He was, I believe, the greatest ruler of his time.

(Question: On Nov. 24th are we going to have Wei Day celebrations? At Empire Divided they celebrate Wu Day.)
I believe in Jesus

I write for the Historical RTS 0 AD

New to the Romance of the Three Kingdoms
Shogun 144
Apprentice
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Aug 07, 2004 4:04 pm

Unread postby Jason » Thu Mar 16, 2006 3:57 am

*pours some liquor on the forum floor* Here's to you Cao Cao. You were a great man, and a great leader, and your praise is carried on til this day, forever in my heart, known as "Better than Liu Bei."


Haha, that rhymed.
“I always wonder why birds choose to stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth, then I ask myself the same question.”

― Harun Yahya
User avatar
Jason
Legendary
 
Posts: 4926
Joined: Sat Oct 05, 2002 4:27 am
Location: Philadelphia

Unread postby Lord Chuff » Thu Mar 16, 2006 4:06 am

Despite being a Shu-ist, I feel sad too. When I read the book for the first time I hated Cao Cao and couldn't wait for him to die. But when it actualy came to his death I suddenly felt sad. He was a talented general who united most of China and achieved more than any other one character in the book. It just felt wrong that he should die of sickness, in bed, rather than on the battlefield.

Rest in peace, Emperor Wu.
Good Lord, it's a cheeseburger!
User avatar
Lord Chuff
Langzhong
 
Posts: 506
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:15 am
Location: Blackwater Park

Next

Return to Sanguo Yanyi Symposium

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

Copyright © 2002–2008 Kongming’s Archives. All Rights Reserved