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Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 7:23 am
by evizaer
I love reading the writings of the famous generals and scholars of the 3 Kingdoms period. Even in the limited commentary that Cao Cao did on the art of war, if ound it very interesting to see how the man thought and get a better feel for what he was like.

This Cao Pi boast-a-thon was a fun read. Thanks for posting it, Lady Wu. :)

Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 7:46 am
by Lady Wu
You guys are most welcome. :D

I really like reading first-hand accounts. They tell you so much more about how people thought and felt, and why they did the things they did, than the more "objective" sources.

Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 4:05 pm
by Wo Long
Wow, that was awesome. I have a new found respect for Cao Pi, and even more respect for Cao Cao about being a parent(as you made note of in the first page of this thread).

Unread postPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 5:14 am
by TheRealWolfman
That is really intresting, it shows me that he wasn't a pompous jerk like in DW5, unless i read wrong. He did seem to think he was unbeatable at times but he knew that he did have weaknesses. He seemed to be a perfectionist and he always wanted to improve his skills with a sword since he mastered the bow.

Unread postPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 5:01 pm
by Wo Long
TheRealWolfman wrote:That is really intresting, it shows me that he wasn't a pompous jerk like in DW5, unless i read wrong. He did seem to think he was unbeatable at times but he knew that he did have weaknesses. He seemed to be a perfectionist and he always wanted to improve his skills with a sword since he mastered the bow.


Don't ever listen to Dynasty Warriors since they are wrong pretty much 99% of the time. And I don't think he thought he was unbeatable, but that he was simply confident in his abilities. He even stated that one of his past teachers could've beaten him easily.

Unread postPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 5:29 pm
by TheRealWolfman
Wo Long wrote:
TheRealWolfman wrote:That is really intresting, it shows me that he wasn't a pompous jerk like in DW5, unless i read wrong. He did seem to think he was unbeatable at times but he knew that he did have weaknesses. He seemed to be a perfectionist and he always wanted to improve his skills with a sword since he mastered the bow.


Don't ever listen to Dynasty Warriors since they are wrong pretty much 99% of the time. And I don't think he thought he was unbeatable, but that he was simply confident in his abilities. He even stated that one of his past teachers could've beaten him easily.


Thats what i mean when he knew he had weakneses. I cant exactly remeber who he said would absolutly pound him to the ground, but he knew he could be beaten.

And i knew that DW isn't always right.

Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 2:16 pm
by siaoyeh
Personally, I don't know much about Chao Pi and why he died of early age...

Cao Pi's autobiography

Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 2:51 pm
by Xian Xu
Lady Wu, Thank you for posting this. It was great.

Lady Wu wrote:In the Dian Lun ... penned by Cao Pi (and which he sent an autographed copy of to Sun Quan :D)


LMAO :lol: That is hilarous.

Re: Cao Pi's autobiography

Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 10:48 am
by hahaguy
I think this not only shows another side of Cao Pi, it shows another side of Cao Cao as well. Comparing it with Liu Bei, I found a huge difference.

Cao Cao, despite being the villian, was a damn good father, bringing his sons along on his campaigns (even after Cao Ang and Cao Anmin died), making them learn the art of war first-hand. He ensured that his heirs were capable and laid foundations of Wei before he died. This is a huge contrast to Liu Bei.

Not for Liu Bei fans:
Although Liu Bei is portrayed as a hero, and a virtous man, he is a terrible father. Although he treated his generals well, I did not see him as a good father/ head of the house. He abandoned his family on occasions. Poor Zhao Yun has to go rescue his wife and his son (Although it did make Zhao Yun famous). After all the effort and hardwork by Zhao Yun, he just throws his son on the ground (We all know how vulnerable babies are!). This just makes him a TERRIBLE father! Not only that, he doesn't regard his family highly, with all the talk about family are like clothing and his generals are like his limbs. The fact that Liu Shan was a terrible ruler was either because he hit his head while he was young, or Liu Bei did not bring him up properly. Either way, it's Liu Bei's fault. Liu Bei did not lay the foundations of Shu before he died, leaving it all to Zhuge Liang.


I would much rather be the son of Cao Cao, the "villian" rather than Liu Bei, the "hero".

Re: Cao Pi's autobiography

Unread postPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 10:03 am
by Dong Zhou
Liu Shan wasn't touch downed by Liu Bei historically and Shan was educated by the likes of Yin Mo, famed scholars of their day. As for being left behind, Cao Cao did that to Cao Ang as well.