Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby capnnerefir » Sun Jul 07, 2013 7:55 pm

I didn't realize that Cao Rui had any surviving children. That's neat to know.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Mon Jul 08, 2013 6:55 am

Got 10 minutes before I have to leave, I'm going to start on this one. There's a mostly fully translated bio in Jordan's ZZTJ for those who want to go searching.

Wei Shu http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%AD%8F% ... 6%99%89%29

Wei Shu (209-290), zi Yangyuan, from Rencheng in Fan county. He was a politician in the Wei-Shu and Jin dynasties, and reached the rank of Situ.

Whole Life

Wei Shu's parents died when he was young, so he was raised by his Mother's Grandfather, of the Ning clan. Wei Shu had already started drinking heavily, and he behaved like he was slow and simple, so no one thought he'd do anything important, although at that time his famous uncle Wei Heng said "If Wei Shu were to take charge of 100 households, I would be content." Additionally, Wei Shu did not act according to normal people's principles, and did not work vigorously to support himself. However, a man named Wang Yi thought he could be a man who could help the Three Excellencies, and often gave to him to help Wei Shu with his poverty.

Wei Shu was over 40 when he decided to take the Shangjiyuan's examination (take some sort of Chinese placement test). His clansmen thought that he was not studious, and advised him to not try it, since there was no chance he could achieve a high rank. However, Wei Shu wanted to attempt it, and started to study on his own, and finished reading the Yijing (maybe something else) within 100 days, and in the end he was able to pass the test and get an official position. He'd later be appointed Mianchi's Xianzhang and Lingyi Xianling, and would later serve in the court as a Shangshulang. At this time there was a government decree to cut back on official ministers. People whose ability was lacking would assume that there would be people who wanted to obtain these cut spots, and Wei Shu unexpectedly said "I'm one of those people." referring to people who would be removed, and this caused people who had no praise as well as his colleagues to feel ashamed, and Wei Shu would recieve praise from everyone for his comments.

Wei Shu would later be named the Houjiangjun Zhong Yu's Changshi, and later would be the Canjun to the Prime Minister Sima Zhao and be named Viscount of Juyang. Wei Shu when handling government affairs would have no issues deciding what was right or wrong, and during the incident where people were expelled from office, there were times when no one could make a decision on something, and Wei Shu would come up with a plan to meet everyone's expectations. Sima Zhao regarded him very highly. Wei Shu would later be appointed governor of Yiyang and Xingyang, where he had a positive reputation, and he would be selected by the Shizhong Ren Kai to be Sanji Changshi, and later was named provisional governor of Jizhou, and in the three years there he would be regarded by the people as benevolent in his political decisions, and would be regarded highly. He'd later be made a Shizhong. Sima Yan in order to nominate him as honorable and incorrupt, would grant him 100 silk rolls. He'd later be appointed Shangshu.

During the later years of the Taikang period (280-289), Wei Shu would be named Shangshu Youpushe. Wei Shu had once along with Wei Guan, Zhang Hua, and Shan Tao would all request to commemerate Sima Yan's unification of China to hold a Fengchan (special kind of feast an Emperor can hold), but Sima Yan would always politely decline. Wei Shu would later be appointed Shangshu Zuopushe, Lead the ministry of appointments, as well as be named Right Glorious Grand Master, equivalent to the excellencies. In 283, the Situ Shan Tao died, and Wei Shu was appointed to lead Situ affairs, and later would be officially named Situ. Wei Shu would request many times to resign on account of ill health, but would not be permitted, and in this period would be named Yanzhou Zhongzheng. In 286, Wei Shu would use a Solar Eclipse as his reason to resign, determined to be successful. Sima Yan would allow him to do so, while still being ranked with the Three Excellencies. In 290, Wei Shu would die at age 82, named Shihaokang. Sima Yan was deeply grieved upon his death, and bestowed many things onto him.

Personality Characteristics

Its recorded that his height was 8 chi 2 cun, and that he appeared handsome and tall.

Apart from liking to drink, he was also fond of horseback riding and archery; Wei Shu once dressed in the clothes of commoners from the mountains, as well as wear leather jackets in order to go to the countryside to go fishing and hunting.

Although his uncle Wei Heng didn't recognize his ability, to the point even a minor post he couldn't achieve, but Wei Shu never held regrets. He would never call attention to people's shortcomings.

Anecdotes

When Wei Shu lived with his maternal grandfather, there was a fortune teller who came to the house to perform Fengshui, and the fortune teller said that the residence would produce a talented person. The grandfather of Wei Shu thought that it was his nephew, who was smart in his childhood, was the person the fortune teller referred to. Wei Shu said "To stay in this residence would be to be the same as them." (help if you can) and moved out.

Wei Shu once went to Yewang, and was there to witness the owner of the inn's wife give birth. Wei Shu heard the sound of the horses and cart, and heard a voice say "Is it a boy, or is it a girl?" The reply was "Boy. Please write it down, when he turns 15 years old, he'll die in the army. Another voice said, "Whose sleeping here." The reply was "Its Wei Shu." 15 years later Wei Shu would return to Yewang, and ask the owner of the inn how the boy was. He replied "He was tending to a mulberry tree and got hit with an axe and died." Wei Shu therefore knew that he would become a noble. (if anyone can add something, please, since my translation is fine, but I don't get how this works).

During the time Wei Shu was Zhong Yu's Changshi, Zhong Yu attended an archery contest, and Wei Shu's responsibility was only to record Zhong Yu's score. One of Zhong Yu's friends didn't show, and as Wei Shu was counting all the people Zhong Yu didn't know how good of an archer Wei Shu was. He saw Wei Shu easily use a bow, hitting the target each time, which shocked everyone, and no one was his equal. Zhong Yu lamented toward Wei Shu and said "I'll never make full use of your talent, just now I never knew how good of an archer you were, how could I overlook such a minor thing?"
Last edited by Tarrot on Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby capnnerefir » Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:47 am

Tarrot wrote:Got 10 minutes before I have to leave, I'm going to start on this one. There's a mostly fully translated bio in Jordan's ZZTJ for those who want to go searching.

That sounds like me. I think I remember him - one of Sima Zhao's friends. Of course I don't know anything about his career after 264.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:36 pm

Done with most of the major people from Ren Kai's bio. Here are the people I'm planning to do next, in no particular order:

Sima Yan
Sima Zhong
Jia Nanfeng
Sima Wang
Shi Bao
Wang Shen (He Zeng's bio)
Sima Fu
Chen Qian
Zhang Hua
Sima You
Yang Hu (may not since his SGZ is translated)
Yang Yao (Xun Xu's bio)
He Jiao (Xun Xu's bio)
Wang Jun
Du Yu


If anyone has any other requests from late Jin, let me know. I think Ma Jun also has a SGZ out there, so I won't bother with him.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby capnnerefir » Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:45 pm

I would also suggest:
Jia Chong
Hu Fen
Wang Rong
Wei Guan
Yang Jun
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Tue Jul 09, 2013 8:00 pm

This will probably take a couple days. Sima Yan translated, thankfully half of the page is commentary and relatives. http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%8F%B8% ... C%E7%82%8E

Sima Yan (236-290), zi Anshi, from Wen county in Henei, founded the Jin Empire, a posthumous name of Wu Emperor, although later generations would address him as Jin Emperor.

Eldest son of Sima Zhao, in 266, he'd force the Wei Emperor to abdicate and take the throne himself, and declared the lands under the sky to be named Jin, changing the reign title to Taishi. While on the throne, he'd name all his family as Kings, using states for the purpose of the country, installing military units, with the desire to maintain peace, in order to protect the central part of the state. He developed many economic measures to develop manufacturing, and had his local officials go around to support mulberry farmers, while prohibiting private farmers. (So he's anti-corporation?) He'd also promote local officials from Wu and Shu and move them to the north, and would take people who were doing Tuntian farming and have them rejoin the commoners.

In the first year of Taikang, he issued an order for people to move around, including the Zhantian system, which was for transfering manufactured goods as well as the "Pingguan Zhantian Yinkezhi." (no idea what this is) The Taikang period would produce a prosperous economy. Continuing from the end of the Wei rule, the people still felt depressed and dejected, life was grand and extravagent, which was called "Rectifying through the use of Humane Frugality", such that widows, widowers, and lonely people were unable to have a mere 5 kernals of corn, and could not flee from debt and had to bear it, which lead to an imperial order to patrol through the counties, and to hold discussions with people. With an importance on Law, Jia Chong printed out copies of the law, and personally heard accounts from prisoners. However, after the fall of Wu, the country grew more idle in politics, licentious without limit.

Noting that the gradual weakening of the Cao family allowed his father to take control, he consolidated all his power in a central area, and had all the Imperial Kings to command troops, such that upon his death, all the Kings fought over the central government, which would lead a 16 year struggle referred to as the War of the 8 Princes.

Whole Life

Early Years

As he was the eldest son of Sima Zhao (whose mother, Wang Yuanji was the daughter of the scholar Wang Su), he was appointed to an important position as Zhongfujun. Sima Zhao once thought that because everything he had came from his older brother Sima Shi, intended to have Sima Shi's son Sima You ascend to be Emperor, but because many important ministers disagreed, in 265 Sima Yan was named heir. The same year Sima Zhao died, and Sima Yan inherited the Jin throne.

Ascending to the throne

In 265, Sima Zhao died at age 55. Sima Yan inherited the position as Prime Minister, and held power over the whole army. After preparing stringently, and in the 12th month of the year, he mirrored Cao Pi's example, and prepared to ascend to the throne. After Sima Yan recieved the position of Prime Minister, there were many officials urging Cao Huan to let Sima Yan ascend. After a little while, Cao Huan said "King of Jin, your family has assisted the Emperor, your power is greater than the heavens, the whole world has benefited from your favor, and the heavens want me to yield my position to you, please comply with the heavens, don't refuse!" However, Sima Yan would refuse many times. Sima Yan's trusted aide He Zeng and the Weijiangjun Jia Chong guided the court in admonishing him three times. After Sima Yan had refused many times, he finally accepted the Wei emperor's abdication, and named Cao Huan as the King of Chen Liu. As a result in 265, Sima Yan became Emperor, changed the state title to Jin, which history would call Western Jin, and became the Jin Emperor.

Extinguishing Wu

The Jin emperor put in place a series of political policies, which improved the country's economic condition. At this time, Wu was in a state of disorder, as the Wu emperor Sun Hao was unconcerned with internal affairs and spent extravagently, causing the people to lose faith in him. In 270, the Hexi Xianbei Chieftan Tufa Shujineng rebelled, and in the next year the Xiong Nu's Liu Meng would also revolt. In 272, Sima Yan sent He Zhen to subdue Li Ke and pacify the rebellion of Liu Meng. In 275, Sima Yan released his slaves and servants to work on the Tuntian farms, Shujineng gave up, and the Tuoba Xianbei of the desert sent an ambassador to the Jin Empire, and Ma Long pacified the Xianbei. For the purpose of defending against Wu, Sima Yan sent Yang Hu to Xiangyang to guard against the Wu general Lu Kang, and sent Wang Jun to Yizhou to start on shipbuilding. In 274, Lu Kang died, and in 276 Yang Hu suggested an attack on Wu, but many ministers opposed it and it was dropped. In 277 Shujineng rebelled again, and Sima Yan sent Wen Yang to quell Shujineng, and killed 20,000 Xianbei. The old lords of the Desert Han were killed, and Wei Guan pacified the Tuoba Xianbei. In 278 Yang Hu died of illness, and he suggested Du Yu to guard Jingzhou. At this time Sima Yan sent Ma Long to Liangzhou to quell a rebellion, and Shujineng was killed. In 279 as the Xianbei were getting more peaceful, Du Yu and Wang Jun sent a letter to Sima Yan thinking that it was time to attack Wu. Jia Xu, Xun Xu and others thought the Xianbei situation was still not stable and opposed it. In the end Sima Yan decided that in the 12th month he'd attack Wu, which was known as the Jin's extinguishing of Wu. He named Jia Chong Dadudu, and sent from the north Wang Jun and Tang Bin, and sent from the middle Du Yu, Hu Fen, and Wang Rong, and sent from the south Wang Hun and Sima Zhou to advance. In 280 as they approached Jian Ye, Sun Hao saw the large force and proceeded to surrender, Wu was defeated, and the Three Kingdoms were finally unified.

Taikang Politics

After establishing Jin, Sima Yan carried out a series of economic policies to promote production, always making county officials promote mulberry farming, and prohibiting private farmers. He would also take great men of Shu and Wu, and move them to populate the north, as well as abolishing the Tuntian system, and used the Tuntian farmers to populate households, so that in 282, there was a total of 3,770,000 households. The Jin Shu: Book of Food and Money says "After the fall of Wu, there were no issues in the world, taxation was fair, and people became peaceful and prosperous as well as happy with their life." At the end of the Taikang period, there would be an order for households to move (?) including the Zhantian system, which was for transfering manufactured goods as well as the "Pingguan Zhantian Yinkezhi." (no idea what this is, again). The Taikang years would be viewed as an era of peace and prosperity, which would give rise to the maxim "TaikangziZhi" (litterally, Taikang politics).

Grants to the Imperial Clan

Sima Yan took from the example of the decline of the Wei Emperors, with the Emperors being weak and frail, and from the end came up with the lesson that there should be grants to the Imperial clan members to be vassal lords, in order to resist the land-owners. He had royal members not only occupy states, but also had officials help all of the Imperial clan members, and he would continue to distribute all the members to states, so they could supervise military affairs, and would later be put in charge of valuable places in the country. The idea of this was to resist land owners from gaining power. However, The War of the 8 Princes would testify, this policy would cause all of the lords who held power to have their own ambition and armies.

The reason that the Jin empire put so much political power into the hands of imperial clan members, rather than being different from other regimes had a lot in common. The Jin empire has the Sima clan form a clique that would combine to rule, and the Sima clan would emulate other clans, with the Emperor as the head of the clan, and the other clans members would have qualifications and be necessary to gain power, in order to maintain their superiority and place.

Suspending the County Soldiers

After the unification of the state, Sima Yan gave out the following orders: "To all county soldiers, large counties shall have 100 soldiers, small ones shall have 50 soldiers." with the provisions:

1: All states without any issues must abandon their military

2: County Supervisors only for the purpose of supervision may maintain their titles as generals, they can't raise troops, and may not have more than two Military Officers.

3: To implement a separation from the people and the army, all military officers will command troops, while provisional governors and administrators will govern the people.

With abandoning local troops, on one hand it can allow civil officials to focus on civil matters, in addition to expanding responsibilities to labor. Since the Yellow Turban rebellion in 184 the peasants felt the heaviest burden, so to prevent this burden, there was an increased importance on production, however because of the county troops, law and order couldn't be maintained, and as a result in 301 the whole country fell into rebellion, and the local officials were powerless.

The Ruler and Minister's abundance

The Jin family members and nobles all had a solid economic foundation, and the stability and unification of the land allowed them to acquire more wealth, and as a result they enjoyed life without a care, having a luxurious, extravagent life. Sima Yan was a model for this kind of life, with the Jing Shu: Outragously Expensive Concubine (its what it says) saying: "Much love on the inside, after the conquering of Wu, he would take the thousand concuines of Sun Hao, and held 10,000 people in the Imperial Palace, and favored many, with the emperor knowing all of them, always making use of the sheep chariot (what?), abandoning all restraint, until he would feast and lie down." [In the history of Chinese history, there had never been a case of such debauchery] (this is a flagged sentence on the Chinese wiki, not cited), to the extent that people of lower rank held power, and spent wastefully, with the general mood progressing toward corruption. The public officials would themselves strive for extravagance, such as the official He Zeng spending 10,000 dollars a day on food, and "never putting down chopsticks," and his son He Shao would eat all kinds of food, with daily meals costing 20,000 dollars. Wang Kai was Sima Yan's uncle on his mother's side (Wang Yuanji), and him along with a rich millionaire Shi Chong had a competition to see who could show off the most wealth, striving to be the winner. In order to preserve this kind of life, it was inevitable to intensify taxation, which gave way to corruption and bribery, which people became accustomed to, to which people at the time said "Such luxurious spending, Oh what a disaster!" and it can be seen this caused a great deal of harm.

This also indirectly impacted the next shift in lifestyle, as people would inform the Emperor that people in the street had nothing to eat, to which Sima Yan said "Why cant they just eat meat?" (or Rice Gruel, but I like this translation better, again help appreciated for accuracy)

Death

In 290 Sima Yan died in the palace halls, and his son Sima Zhong would ascend, and become the Hui emperor. A year later, the Empress Jia Nanfeng would launch a coup d'etat, and kill Yang Jun while trying to monopolize power, this would lead to the "War of the 8 princes." In 316 Liu Yuan's nephew Liu Yao would break through Chang'An, and capture the Jin Emperor Sima Ye, extinguishing Jin. It would only be 25 years after Sima Yan's death.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Cao Chao » Thu Jul 11, 2013 3:25 pm

I just realized that I wrote up Wang Jun's bio (note different from the Wang Jun that ended Sun Wu) a few years ago. See below.
Wang Jun (王浚), styled Pengzu (彭祖), was born in 252 AD, the illegitimate son of Wang Shen (王沈), the General of Chariots and Cavalry for the Western Jin Dynasty. As his mother came from a poor commoner’s family, his father despised him and refused to recognize him.

It was only when Wang Shen died in 266 without any other issue, was Wang Jun formally recognized by the family. In 282, Wang Jun was appointed as a liaison with the northern tribes. In 291, simultaneously with his elevation to foreign affairs attendant, he was also appointed to the dual military positions of Commandant of the Surpassing Riders and General of the Right. He was later appointed an Imperial Corps Commanders to defend Xuchang. When Empress Jia deposed Crown Prince Sima Yu, Wang Jun was instrumental in instigating and helping the eunuch, Sun Lü, poison him to death.

Wang Jun later rose to the rank of General Who Pacifies the North and Imperial Inspector of Qingzhou. When he became General Who Pacifies the Beginning, he was sent to Youzhou to direct military affairs. Amidst a political environment beset by the rebellion of the Eight Princes, as well as the rise in banditry, Wang Jun worked to better relations with the barbarian tribes to protect his position and himself. When the Prince of Zhao, Sima Lun, declared himself Emperor in 301, Wang Jun supported him and refused a number of orders sent to Youzhou demanding his assistance in suppressing Sima Lun. Such a move provoked the Prince of Chengdu to make preparations to attack. With no alternative, Wang Jun eventually supported measures to defeat Sima Lun, though he himself did not make any offensive moves personally. For his role, he was promoted to the rank of General Who Secures the North.

At the same time as the political maneuverings that led to the death of Sima Ai, Wang Jun was the target of an assassination plot instigated by Sima Ying through the newly appointed Inspector of Youzhou, He Yan, and the Chanyu of the Wuhuan, Pan Deng. Because of rain, all of the weapons rusted and the plot failed. Believing that the Heavens were supporting Wang Jun, the Wuhuan Chanyu decided to support Wang Jun. With the support of Duke Sima Sheng, Wang Jun and Pan Deng surrounded, captured, and executed He Yan. With He Yan’s death, Sima Ying attempted to recall Wang Jun, who refused to budge after he reached Jizhou. Allying with Sima Sheng, Duan Wuwuchen, and Jie Zhu, Wang Jun attacked Sima Ying. Wang Jun defeated Wang Wu and Shi Chao before assailing Ye. In a panic, Sima Ying fled back to Luoyang, while Wang Jun captured, looted, and raped the city.

Returning to Yizhou, Wang Jun’s army increased dramatically. In 302, Wang Jun and the Prince of Fanyang, Sima Xiao, recommended Sima Yue become Regent. Plans were made to recover Emperor Hui of Jin who had been seized and taken to Chang’an by Zhang Fang. He helped Sima Yue capture Chang’an and return the Emperor to Luoyang. Wang Jun was promoted to General of the Chariots and Cavalry and was dispatched to supervise the eastern barbarians and to serve as Inspector of Youzhou. When Emperor Huai ascended to the throne, Wang Jun became Minister of Works.

In 308, when Shi Le raided Changshan Commandery, Wang Jun led troops to beat him back. When Shi Le returned the following year, Wang Jun dispatched the Wuhuan cavalry to reinforce Changshan, before heavily defeating Shi Le at Feilong Mountain. As the Inspector of Jizhou, Wang Wu, died at Shi Le’s hands, Wang Jun added it to his growing list of ranks. In 310, when Shi Le returned and attacked Xiangcheng Commandery, Wang Jun dispatched Xianbei Duan Wenyang to reinforce, forcing Shi Le to retreat. In 311, an edict was issued promoting Wang Jun to the ranks of Grand Commandant, Inner Minister, Commander-in-Chief, and Director of Military Affairs for Jizhou and Youzhou. But before the edict could leave Luoyang, the city fell to Liu Yao of Han-Zhao. Emperor Huai was captured. With the Xianbei chief, Duan Jilujuan, Wang Jun defeated Shi Le. Duan Mopei, the cousin of the Xianbei chief was captured. Even though his subordinates wanted Duan Mopei executed, Shi Le treated the captive well and ultimately released him. As a result, the Xianbei gradually began to distance themselves from Wang Jun.

At the time, Liu Kun had captured Jizhou and had induced the surrender of Dai, Shanggu, and Guangning Commanderies. With the loss of this more important territory, Wang Jun was forced to redirect the majority of troops against Liu Kun. Facing Wang Jun’s overwhelming strength, Liu Kun was forced to retreat.

With Liu Kun in retreat, Wang Jun planned another campaign against Shi Le. Because of frequent refused Wang Jun’s commands and bribes from Shi Le, Duan Jilujuan refused to support Wang Jun. Furious, Wang Jun enticed the Right Sage King of the Tuoba branch of the Xianbei, Rilusun to attack Duan Jilujuan. The attack was swiftly defeated.

Because Emperor Huai was a captive and because the Inspector of Bingzhou, Liu Kun, was being threatened by Han-Zhao, a mass exodus of refugees entered into Wang Jun’s lands, gradually making him even more rich and powerful. Taking advantage of the situation, Wang Jun made preparations to declare himself Emperor.

Wang Jun slowly became increasingly violent and extravagant. Expensive public works projects sapped the strength of the common people. The Xianbei, who Wang Jun had relied upon so much, had become estranged. Even worse, a drought and a locust infestation had afflicted the lands that he controlled.

Shi Le feigned surrender and continuously plied Wang Jun with tribute and treasure. Joyously, Wang Jun accepted Shi Le’s surrender and took no measures to protect himself in the event of a rebellion. In 314, refusing to heed the advice from one of his subordinates, Wang Jun took measures to welcome Shi Le to his capital at Ji. Shi Le took advantage of the situation, capturing and executing Wang Jun. Wang Jun’s head was later gifted to the ruler of Han-Zhao, Liu Cong.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby capnnerefir » Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:18 pm

Wang Jun sounds absolutely fascinating to me. He seems like he was quite talented but very sinister.

I must admit, though, that I was apparently getting two people confused. I thought that the Wang Jun who led armies during the War of Eight Princes was the same Wang Jun who led the navy during Jin's conquest of Wu. Glancing at Wikipedia made it clear to me that they very different people - Wang Pengzu and Wang Shizhi.

Wang Jun (Shizhi) might also be worth translating.

It's also really interesting to have more information about Sima Yan. I think it's easy to see both why he was able to put China back together and the reasons why he drastically failed at keeping it that way and why everything fell apart after his death.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Thu Jul 11, 2013 7:33 pm

Next guys up: Sima You, Sima Zhong, Jia Nanfeng, with focusing on the internal politics, before going to the guys involved in the conquest of Wu. I'm including this outside the bio, since its my own speculation, but does anyone else after reading this, and after reading Feng Dan and Xun Xu's bio, think that those two were responsible for Sima You's death? I can presume they had a role in paying off the doctor to lie about his condition, but I'm wondering if they did anything else to make his condition worse.

Sima You http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%8F%B8% ... C%E6%94%B8

Sima You (248-283), zi Dayou, xiaozi Taofu, from Henei in Wen county. He was an official in the Wei dynasty as well as a member of the Jin imperial clan. He was the second son of Sima Zhao, who was made Sima Shi's son in order to continue Sima Shi's line (I presume Sima Shi had no sons since this is a common practice for those who die without a male heir), he held the same mother as Sima Yan (Wang Yuanji) and was the father of Sima Jiong who took part in the War of the 8 Princes.

Whole Life

Early Years

Sima You had been recognize as brilliant since his early years, having a gentle personality, people he was intimate with recognized his talent, and he was happy toward them; he also liked studying Confucian texts, and he could write essays, and was especially good at writing letters, and therefore he became a model of the time. His talent and prestige surpassed his brother Sima Yan, and even his grandfather Sima Yi highly regarded him. (Note: Sima Yi died when Sima You was 3, so I doubt the validity of this) Because Sima Shi had no heir, he was chosen to inherit Sima Shi's lineage. In 251, the Taiwei Wang Ling planned to betray the Sima clan, so Sima Yi took the army to arrest him, and brought Sima You with him, and Sima You was named Changleting Marquis. (again, 3 years old) In 255 after Sima Shi died of illness during the campaign against Guanqui Jan and Wen Qin, Sima You inherited his lineage as well as his title as Wuyang Marquis.

Assisting in court politics

Sima You was appointed Sanji Changshi, Bubing Xiaowei, and supervised the troops, having a lot of power and prestige. In 264, Sima You was bestowed Anchang Marquis, and made Weijiangjun. In the next year Sima Yan established Jin, and Sima You was made King of Qi. Sima You at that time was in charge of military affairs, appeasing people inside and outside of Jin, and became popular with the people. At that time Sima Yan ordered that all the kings could select their own officials. Although three Shangshus rejected Sima You's request, Sima Yan was in the future able to fill the vacancies with court nominations, which he didn't arrange himself. Additionally, all of the Imperial family's expenses were handled by the Court, but Sima You already had sufficient living expenses from the tributes to his nobility, and many times rejected financial assistance from the court, but he still received it. Additionally, since Sima Yan lived in Luo Yang and didn't go to his granted state, the state soldiers and officials still paid him a monetary amount, so everytime someone died he would bestow cash on the family as well as condolences. (any assistance translating these is helpful, since I think I got some stuff confused) Additionally when natural disasters caused people to lose their farm products, Sima You would appear to raise the people's spirits and buy their goods, as well as reducing taxation, and let them pay with a later harvest, so this caused the people of his state to have complete confidence in him. Sima You would be made Piaoqi Jiangjun, with his position the same as the Three Excellencies, and although he held such a high position he was still modest and treated people fairly. Because Sima You was so popular, that although traditionally the Piaoqi Jiangjun was to relinquish control of his troops, the thousands of men under Sima You's control refused to leave him, such that Sima Yan permitted them to remain under his command. Sima You would later be appointed Zhenjun Dajiangjun, made a Shizhong, and named Taizi Xiaofu (a name for when a Crown Prince was named an excellency I believe), and was many years later named Taizi Dafu (bigger than Xiaofu). In 276, he took over for Jia Chong as Sikong.

Dying of bitterness and anger

Before Sima Zhao's death, he called from the examples of the Wester Han Huinan King Liu Chang and the Cao-Wei Chensi King Cao Zhi, officials advised Sima Yan and Sima You should coexist peacefully; before Wang Yuanji's death she also gave similar advice. However, after extinguishing Wu Sima Yan's health began to falter, and the crown prince and all other princes were weak, and the court officials all wanted Sima You to be named successor. But at that time Sima You hated with a passion the court officials Xun Xu and Feng Dan, who flattered all over Sima Yan with their behavior, and the two men feared that if Sima You took power, they'd be banished from the court, and as a result out of respect for the crown prince wanted Sima You to leave the court and return to Qi. Sima Yan eventually listened to their request and in 282 named Sima You Da Sima, Jiajie, Dudu of Qingzhou's military affair, and that he must return to Qi. Sima Yan knew the reason for this and wasn't happy, and also knew that it was a plot to leave the capital by Xun Xu and his people, and his anger caused him to get sick. He begged to stay behind and reside in his mother's tomb, but he was not permitted to do so. Sima Yan also sent a doctor to check on Sima You's health, however the doctors all said Sima You wasn't sick, to the point that even as Sima Yan's health worsened he was still urged to leave quickly. Although Sima You was ill he still said his fairwell, and dressed up in official clothes, so that he would look ok, which convinced Sima Yan more that Sima You wasn't sick, although after a short while Sima You would vomit blood and die at age 36. At his brother's death Sima Yan broke down, but Feng Dan said "The King of Qi's, even though he died of illness today, is actually good fortune to the court. Your majesty has no reason to worry!" to which Sima Yan stopped crying. As Sima Yan prepared for Sima You's funeral, Sima You's son Sima Jiong said that the doctors falsely accused Sima You of not being sick, so Sima Yan executed the doctors who made such a claim. Sima You was posthumously named "Xian."

Personality Characteristics

When Sima Shi died, although he was young Sima You grieved heavily for his uncle's death, and when people saw this they praised him for it; he would also care after the Jingshen Empress Wang Huiyu (Sima Shi's 3rd wife), and was well known for his filial piety toward her. After Sima Zhao died, Sima You was so distressed over his father's death that he had to use a cane to walk, and had no thoughts for tea or food.

Sima You had his own system of etiquitte, and rarely ever made mistakes. When he borrowed books from people and found out the books had mistakes, he would write it down, and put it together when he returned it. And although Sima You was considered better than most people, whenever anything would touch him he'd burst out into tears.
Tarrot
Scholar of Shen Zhou
 
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:59 am

Since I have a few minutes, a bio on Sima Shi's 3rd wife Yang Huiyu http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%BE%8A% ... D%E7%91%9C

Yang Huiyu (214-278), from Taishan in Nandong (modern day Shandong in Feixian). The third wife of Sima Shi. Her grandfather Yang Xu was once an administrator of Nanyang during the Han. Her father was the governor of Shangdang Yang Dao, and her mother was a member of the famous Cai family (Cai Yong and Cai Wenji) of Chenliu. She was a sister of Yang Hu and Yang Cheng as well as Cai Yong's granddaughter.

Whole Life

In 234 Sima Shi poisoned his first wife Xiahou Hui. He'd divorce from his second wife later on, and take Yang Huiyu as his third wife. Yang Huiyu was smart and had a good personality. When Sima Yan became Emperor, he made Sima Shi the first Emperor of Jin, and named Yang Huiyu as the Empress Dowager, praised as "Hongxunguan." (Great example to the court) Because Sima Shi's first wife Xiahou Hui was not given an Empress title, Yang Huiyu many times tried to get her own title and finally in 266 she was named "Jinghuai" Empress. Yang Huiyu would die in 278, with the title of "Jingxian Empress." She was 65, and her family interred her at Junping Mound.



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Including her too since I want to know why she was poisoned, Sima Shi's first wife Xiahou Hui (of note, the Hui are the same character for both women, could be something to indicate what clan they come from possibly) http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%A4%8F% ... F%E5%BE%BD

Xiahou Hui (211-234), zi Yuanrong, Sima Shi's first wife. Her father was the Zhengnan Dajiangjun Xiahou Shang, and her mother was a sister of the Cao-Wei minister Cao Zhen. While she was young, her father due to the pain of loving a concubine died of grief. She would marry Sima Shi and birth 5 daughters.

Whole Life

Xiahou Hui had a graceful bearing, and a lot of insight. Anytime Sima Shi had a plan, she would be there to aid him. At the time that Cao-Wei ruled, Sima Yi had control of many important ministers, and his sons were all had great skill and strategy. Xiahou Hui knew that Sima Shi had an evil plan in his heart, and Sima Shi was distrustful of Xiahou Hui who was related to the Cao clan. As a result, she was poisoned by her husband at age 24.

After Xiahou Hui died, she was buried at Junping mound. When Sima Yan ascended, Xiahou Hui was not given an Empress title. However, after Yang Huiyu repeatedly requests this to be done, in 266, Xiahou Hui was finally given the title of "Jinghuai Empress."
Last edited by Tarrot on Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tarrot
Scholar of Shen Zhou
 
Posts: 1106
Joined: Mon Aug 30, 2004 4:35 am

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