Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby capnnerefir » Sat Jun 29, 2013 7:55 pm

Tarrot wrote:Of note, came by random across another guy, Meng Zong, who there seems to be extremely little info about, but has a decent-sized wiki. I'll do him next since he's a new guy. http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%AD%9F%E5%AE%97


Meng Zong also seems to be mentioned as one of those 24 Paragons of Filial Piety. I don't know if it's the same guy you're thinking of, but he's from the Three Kingdoms. Here's the translation from the site I previously mentioned.

Meng Zong lived during the Three Kingdoms Period of China's past. His father died when he was young, and he and his mother struggled to survive. One winter his mother was stricken with a serious illness, and craved some bamboo-shoot broth as medicine. But in the depths of winter, with snow and ice blanketing the ground, where was anyone to find fresh bamboo shoots, shoots that emerge only in the warm months? Nonetheless, Meng Zong, to avoid disappointing his mother, bravely fetched his shovel and went out into the white landscape in search of bamboo shoots. In the thicket he found only frosted leaves and green stalks coated with snowflakes and ice. Look as he might, there were simply no fresh shoots growing in the winter. The thought of his poor mother lying sick on her bed, waiting for bamboo-broth medicine, made his heartache. Uncontrollably, tears began to fall in rivers to the ground beneath the tall, emerald canes. Even now, as his tears flowed down, he kept a light of faith in his heart. If he was truly sincere in his search, perhaps....

Just then Meng Zong nearly tripped and fell over a sharply protruding lump of earth. He quickly knelt down and knocked aside the dirt with his trembling fingers. How uncanny! Underneath his frozen hands he discovered a bed of fresh, tender bamboo shoots! Overjoyed, he gathered up a coatful and carried them back home. The broth that he quickly set stewing in the pot soon cured his mother's illness.

The neighbors, hearing the story, exclaimed that it was the strength of his sincere, unselfish, filial resolve that inspired heaven and earth to respond, and to bring up, out of season, the fresh shoots that cured his mother's disease. Before Meng Zong's prayers generated this miracle, it was normally considered impossible for bamboo shoots to grow in the winter. After the nmiracle took place, however, people were able to gather and to eat bamboo shoots all year round. The winter variety that existed hereafter became known as "winter shoots."

The villagers were deeply influenced by Meng Zong's courage and devotion. They renamed the spot where the event took place, "Meng Zong's Bamboo Grove". We can now enjoy bamboo sprouts during the winter as well, and as we do so, it is fitting to recollect Meng Zong's outstanding example of filial respect, and reflect on our conduct as sons and daughter of our parents
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Sat Jun 29, 2013 8:26 pm

Wang Xiang up with anecdotes about his filial piety (also available in the ZZTJ), next up Meng Zong who seems severely overlooked. http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%AD%9F%E5%AE%97

Meng Zong (?-271), also known as Meng Ren, he would change his surname to avoid the taboo of having the same surname as Emperor Sun Hao, zi Gongwu, from Jiangxia, Jingzhou in Meng county. Because of his filial piety, there is a story of how he cried which gave life to bamboo sprouts, making him one of the 24 paragons of Filial Piety, known for his "Tears which brought bamboo shoots from the frozen earth." He would serve Wu as a Dachen, as well as a Sikong.

Whole Life

He studied with Li Su of Nanyang when he was younger. Li Su felt amazed toward Meng Zong, as he could spend the whole day and night reading without any issues. He would later hold positions as the Junshi of Cavalry General Zhu Ju, as well as the Sima (Major) of Yanchi and Magistrate of Wu. In 237, Sun Quan said that officials could not abandon their posts to go home for funerals, and people who violated this would be put to death. However, Meng Zong would abandon his post for this reason, and would later delay his return to the court to deal with an offender in Wuchang. Because Lu Xun said that his actions were because of filial piety, he pleaded for leniency to save him from death, and Sun Quan allowed it for only this time, showing preferential treatment to Meng Zong.

Meng Zong would again be nominated for office, eventually becoming a Guangluxun (Supervisor of Attendants). After 5 years in Yongan, he would become the Right Yushidaifu, and later would join the Prime Minister. In 268 he'd achieve Sikong. In 271 he would die and be buried in Wuchang.

Characteristics of Filial Piety

Meng Zong was well known for his filial piety, with history books recording numerous examples of his piousness.

1: When Meng Zong was assigned to be Zhu Ju's Junshi, his parents would stay with him in the military camp. However, Meng Zong was not successful at this time, and when it would rain on their small cabin the water would leak, causing Meng Zong to weep toward his parents asking for forgiveness. However, his mother encouraged him not to cry. When Zhu Ju heard this story, he'd recommend Meng Zong as the Sima of Yanchi.

2: While the Sima of Yanchi, Meng Zong would throw nets to catch fish by himself, and would salt and preserve the fish himself to send to his parents. However, his mom would return the fish to him so he would not arouse suspicion.

3: When Meng Zong was the magistrate of Wuxian, because he couldn't bring his family members to his official post, whenever he would get food, he would first send it to his mother and only then would eat his food.

4: Meng Zong's mother really like to eat bamboo, and one time in the middle of winter she wanted to eat bamboo, but the bamboo had not grown yet. Meng Zong was unable to find any bamboo in the forest, and sighed in grief. However, bamboo at this time suddenly sprouted, allowing Meng Zong to harvest it to give his mother to eat. Everyone believed Meng Zong's filial piety moved the heavens, making the bamboo grow at that moment.

5: When Meng Zong's mother die, while fully aware he would be killed for abandoning his post to attend to her funeral, still braved death to go home for the sake of his piety.

=============================================================

Cap: Got your message when doing the translation, I knew there was a Meng Zong who worked with Wu, but nothing about him, which is what I meant. I actually got him from checking the Chinese Wiki on the 24 guys of Filial Piety, so its the same guy. They also list Lu Ji, who I'm actually unaware of his example in history, as someone from the 3k era who is one of the 24.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby capnnerefir » Sat Jun 29, 2013 10:33 pm

Very interesting. I suppose I shouldn't be surprised that Sun Quan thought about executing people who went home to funerals.

Tarrot wrote: He would serve Wu as a Dachen, as well as a Sikong.

I didn't think that Wu had a Sikong. I was under the impression that they only had a Chengxiang and presumably a Yushi dafu as the chief ministers.

I learn something new every day it seems.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Sun Jun 30, 2013 9:08 pm

Doing this till the Naniwa/Polt SC2 match is done then going to sleep, I'll finish it off tomorrow.

He Zeng http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E4%BD%95%E6%9B%BE

He Zeng (199-279, January 12th), zi Yingkao, from Yangxia, Chengguo. An officer in Cao-Wei and Jin, his father He Kui was a Taipu, and his great grand father He Xi was a Cheqi General (I think Chariot). He behaved studiously and aiming at fame, he was as famous as Yuan Kan. In Jin he held the ranks of Taibao, Taifu, and Taizai.

Whole LIfe:

Inheriting from his father

He Zeng's father died when he was young, and he inherited his father's Yangwuting Marquis. Cao Rui at the time was still Pingyuan marquis, and He Zeng had been previously appointed to help the Pingyuan Marquis with Litterature (any help appreciated). When Cao Rui ascended He Zeng held jobs as a Sanji Shilang, the Diannong Zhonglanjiang of Ji county, an official position as Huangmen Shilang and Sanji Changshi. He'd later take up position as the governor of Henei, where he'd receive much praise, and later be appointed a Shizhong.

Assisting the Jin Dynasty

When Cao Fang succeeded, he'd be assisted by Cao Shuang as well as the figurehead Dacheng Sima Yi. In 247, Sima Yi fell ill and avoided meeting with Cao Shuang, while He Zeng would also retire on account of illness. In 249, Sima Yi launched his Gaoping Hill rebellion, took control in Luo village, and Cao Shuang handed over his power, and was immediately executed by Sima Yi, and He Zeng would take office once again. During the Jiaping period (249-254), he'd be appointed Sili Xiaowei. At that time the provisional governor Yin Mo would rely on favor to accumulate riches, and accumulated much illegal wealth; No one in the court dared accuse him, except for He Zeng, accusing him of illegal actions, and received praise from the court. He Zeng would also participate in Sima Shi's deposing of Cao Fang in 253.

He Zeng was a Sili Xiaowei for many years before being assigned as a Shangshu. In the Zhengyuan period (254-256), he would hold the positions of Zhenbei General, as well as Jiajie Commander in Chief of He Bei military affairs. Upon his departure, Sima Zhao ordered his sons Sima Yan and Sima You to say their farewells to him. He'd later be appointed Zhengbei General and awarded a Yingchangxiang Marquis. In 264 he was appointed Situ, and awarded a Langling Marquis. In 265 Sima Yan would establish Jin, and appointed He Zeng as his Chengxiang (Prime Minister) as well as appointing him Shizhong.

Ranking among the Excellencies

Not long after, He Zeng along with Pei Xiu and Wang Shen advised Sima Yan to become Emperor. The same year, Sima Yan received Cao Huan's abdication, and appointed He Zeng as Taiwei, named him Duke of Langlingxian, with a tribute of 1800 households. In 267, He Zeng was appointed Taibao, while remaining a Shizhong. In 273, he was again named Situ. In 276, He was named Taifu. In 278, he attempted to retire many times due to his old age, and Sima Yan named him Taizai, where he was allowed to maintain his sword and clogs and ride the imperial carriage to court, as well as bestowed upon him cash and silk. Everytime he was summoned, he was allowed to bring his ordinary food and clothes, as well as his two children to accompany him. In 279, He Zeng passed away, at 80 years old. Sima Yan in court wore mourning clothes and grieved for He Zeng, and conferred upon him money and silk, as well as a coffin and burial clothes. When discussing his posthumous title, the Boshi Pei Xiu recommended Duke of Choumiao, but Sima Yan didn't listen and named him Duke of Xiao (filial piety). At the end of the Taikang period (280-289), his son changed the posthumous name to Yuan.

Personality Characteristics

He Zeng fiercely attacked Ruan Ji for how rude he acted during the morning period (look up Ruan Ji for the specific story), and got into a direct confrontation with Ruan Ji in front of Sima Zhao. Although Sima Zhao didn't want to punish Ruan Ji, and wanted He Zeng to tolerate him, but He Zeng directly quoted all of Ruan Ji's actions, and spoke with extreme sincerity, which made the people of the time respect and fear He Zeng.

He Zeng never had inclinations toward music or pornography. (translating what it says) Toward the end of his life, he would always wear clothes when he would meet up with his wife, and they'd show each other formal respect.

He Zeng's personality was to be luxurious and extravagent, with his curtain screen, chariot, mount, and clothing all extremely beautiful. His food quailty surpassed that of aristocracy, such that even when the Emperor was in court, in private he would not eat the Taiguan's prepared food, and rather ask He Zeng for his food. It was record in writing that [(old chinese I can't read)], [(old chinese I cant read)], and it was accepted that he could live such a luxurious life.

He Zeng on the surface was a tolerant man, but he held jealousy and hatred on the inside. At one time a court official Liu Xiang had presented a memorial about He Zeng's luxurious behavior, but Sima Yan regarded him as an important minister, and paid no attention to the criticism. He Zeng would assigned Liu Xiang an official title (presuming this is an official to He Zeng), and people advised him he shouldn't accept, but Liu Xiang thought He Zeng was such a noble man that he wouldn't hold such a grudge, and accepted. However, He Zeng would always find trivial reasons to beat Liu Xiang with a cane.

He Zeng was also a member of Jia Chong's clique, and although He Zeng was much older than Jia Chong, he would attatch himself to Jia Chong's power. There was a time Jia Chong had a drunken debate with Yu Chun, where Yu Chun admonished Jia Chong for his rudeness to his elders and his role in regicide. From that point on when discussing politics Jia Chong would always disparage Yu Chun, and would recieve honest criticism from other officials.

Commentary

All in old Chinese, can't translate.
Last edited by Tarrot on Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Ren Kai, Jin Minister.

Unread postby Jolt » Mon Jul 01, 2013 2:01 am

Great work Tarrot! More officers for my RTK 11 late game officer machine! :)

Tarrot wrote:The only thing I know is that there's no splitting of the names, as they lead all to one link. 且萬能 is Qiewanneng, who is one of the people you referenced. 猝跋韓 is Cubahan. Looking online, I don't see any alternate transliterations, so I'm thinking the other person you referenced was mistaken. I even double-checked my 8000 character dictionary, and there's no reference to alternate pronunciations. I'll edit the wiki translation since they probably are the chieftains. LW might know a little more on the archaic pronunciations.


I remember reading a while ago that established Pinyin conventions towards ancient foreign (Non-Chinese translated names) was indeed to use all characters as a single name.

Tarrot wrote:Zheng Chong (?-274) zi Wen He, from Xingyang, Kaifang. At the end of the Eastern Han, he was around during the end of the Three Kingdoms and the early years of Jin. In CaoWei he became a Taibao, and in Jin he became a Taifu.


By the way, Taibao's translation is Grand Protector. Taifu is Grand Tutor.

Shangshulang means Imperial Secretariat Cadet. Apparently it's a low level entry into the Imperial bureaucracy system that allowed to climb in the social rank.

From what I can gather, Congshizhonglang, which I'd translate as Middle Assistant [Gentleman], which were the personal aides of someone. Apparently this was the title given to physicians during the Qin and Han days.

Sanjichangshi, from what I can gather, appears to be a personal advisor/assistant of the Emperor (Changji means "Regular Attendant", like the famous eunuchs). It translates into something like "Scatterer Mounted Attendant" (The scatter may be the ill advise of other advisors.)

Sikong is Minister of the Works.

Yushizhongcheng is the Palace Assistant Imperial Clerk.

I think the Hou means Marquis rather than a surname.

Sili Xiaowei is the Colonel Director of Retainers.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:44 pm

If I can find a way to edit Peraperakun (my Firefox app) to let me alter the internal dictionary, I'll start adding more title translations in the parentheses. Maybe I'll go back and fix these when I get done with people to do later. But for me, it takes a lot longer to go look up most of the rank translations in order to do the bios. I have Rafe's write-up on most of the Han ranks, but double-checking that takes a while to do.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Tue Jul 02, 2013 8:49 pm

Xun Yi http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E8%8D%80%E9%A1%97

Xun Yi (?-274), zi Jingqian from Yingyin County in the Yingchuan region (modern-day Xuchang in Henan). Served Cao-Wei and Jin as a political official. Was the 6th son of Xun Yu, younger brother of Xun Yun, and older brother of Xun Can.

Whole Life

His father died of illness while he was young, and was raised by his older sister's husband Chen Qun. He was considered a multi-faceted genius in his childhood, such that Chen Qun'd praise him "He learns through what he hears, and is cautious with ideas." When Sima Yi saw the youngster, he sighed and lamented that "(can't directly translate, something about him being righteous and virtuous)."

When Sima Yi and Sima Shi assumed their power, Xun Yi had an intimate relationship with them, and helped them to take the throne. For his efforts in suppressing Guanqiu Jian, he was named Wansuiting Marquis, and later held the post of Sikong. After Sima Zhao died, he took up an official post under Sima Yan, and due to the meritorious service toward his grandfather and father (presuming the Simas), he received the highest praise from Sima Yan, he was named Duke of Linhuai, as well as holding positions as Shizhong and Taiwei.

However, when other people would talk about him, such as the people of Qingliu, the Xun descendants "Assisting monarchs like the wind" praise would be about the Xun family misdeeds. (any help is appreciated on translating this)

In the Jin Empire he would along with Jia Chong selected Sima Zhong as the crown prince, as well as say that Jia Chong's daughter Jia Nanfeng should be the wife of him and praised Jia Nanfeng as "Zideshumao" (Literally beauty virtue warm luxuriant) and praise her at every opportunity. She would be a cruel and arrogant Empress, not caring about massacring people, which seemed like a plan to depose the Emperor, as she was the opposite of how she first appeared.

There was a considerable man, the brilliant Sima You, who when he was chosen to help the ignorant Emperor, Jia Chong would immediately reject this idea and make him the King of Qi, which was a long ways away from the capital. Additionally, "(can't translate, roughly means he caused the fall of Wei)", Jia Chong would push all of Sima Zhong's family to be kings in far away places, and let the local governors all hold their own military power, and owing to "The example of the 7 states of Wuchu" (any help appreciated), with the result being what would later be known as "The War of the 8 Princes." (know there's an official name for this, not sure what)

Xun Yi was a man who carefully chose his alliances, with Sima Yi, Shi, Zhao, as well as Jia Chong, and acted as a man who those in power could trust, but he attached extreme importance to his position and power. According to the Book of Jin, Chapter of Xun Yi, "(roughly translated, he was a man who only thought of his own position)" and because of his actions he'd receive severe criticism in later generations.

In "Romance of the Three Kingdoms", when Sima Zhao was debating whether to name Sima Yan or Sima You as the crown prince, Xun Yi suggested to go with the elder Sima Yan.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Wed Jul 03, 2013 9:24 pm

Pei Xiu http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E8%A3%B4%E7%A7%80

Of note: He was an exceptional cartographer, and his english wiki here has a lot of information on him. I may skip out on the Cartography part of his Chinese wiki just because there's already a better source for that information.

Pei Xiu (224-271), zi Jiyan, from Wenxi, Hedong. A western Jin politician as well as an expert cartographer. From his early years in politics, he always had considerable trust with Sima Zhao and Sima Yan, presiding over the new official and feudal ranking system during the end of Wei and the beginning of Jin, later being appointed Sikong. He was the owner of the earliest written maps in China, the "Yugong region map" (better translation?) and would later publish his "6 principles of mapmaking", which had a large influence on later mapmaking. He would die from eating cold food and drinking cold wine.

Whole Life

Pei Xiu was born in an official's house. His grandfather Pei Mao, and father Pei Qian, were both distinguished political officers in the Han and Cao-Wei dynasties. Pei Xiu was always intelligent and studious since childhood. His uncle Pei Hui was also reknown, with the whole family having visitors coming and going, and after visiting with Pei Hui, would go and chat with the 10 year old Pei Xiu. The people would day "Pei Xiu is a future leader." Guanqui Jian would recommend him to the Commander Cao Shuang, who would name him a Huangmen Shilang, and would let him inherit his father's Jueqingyangting Marquis. After Cao Shuang died, Sima Zhao would assume positions as Andong jiangjun as well as Weijiangjun, and during the wars with Shu and Wu, Pei Xiu would hold office as a Sima, and would gain the trust of Sima Zhao. In 257 when Zhuge Dan rebelled, Pei Xiu would act as a staff officer along with Chen Ta and Zhong Hui, and they would all participate in the suppression of Zhuge Dan. After the death of Zhuge Dan, he'd be conferred as Luyangxiang Marquis.

In 260 Cao Mao rebelled and was killed, Pei Xiu handled the affairs to let Cao Huan become Emperor, and was promoted from a country marquis to a county marquis, as well as appointed Shangshu Pushe. At that time Xun Yi was responsible for drawing up etiquitte rules, Jia Chong too charge in editting the law, and Pei Xiu was put in charge of drawing up the new civil service and nobility ranks. He proposed to re-establish the Western Zhou 5 ranks of nobility, which would allow a large number of the Sima clan's supporters to obtain ranks. Later when determining Sima Zhao's successor, he said "(pick Sima Yan, can't translate fully)" which led Sima Zhao to select Sima Yan as his successor. In 265 Sima Yan became Emperor, and appointed Pei Xiu Duke of Julu, shangshuling, and would name him Sikong in 268.

As a result of the Sikong post, he was responsible for civil engineering and farming. Owing to his position he didn't resemble a normal Shangshulng busy with administrative work, but instead he had access to books on the geography of every region, which was of interest to him. Additionally because of Pei Xiu's innate brilliance, he would allow army officers to provide advice (I think its this, could be the other way him providing advice), and paid attention to the whole region's topography and terrain. At this time he wanted to comment and correct the mistakes made by the "Shangshu.Yugong." As a result he wrote the "Yugong region map" which was 18 pian, as well as proposed the "6 principles of mapmaking." In 271, the man the people called the "Modern-age Famous Duke" (help) Pei Xiu was taking medicine along with cold food, and eating cold rice, he was to drink warm wine to recover, but he mistakenly drank cold wine and died.

Mapmaking Contributions
-See the English wiki, there's more information there. Not going to translate this when there's a perfectly good translation already.
Last edited by Tarrot on Thu Jul 04, 2013 3:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby capnnerefir » Wed Jul 03, 2013 11:45 pm

Ooh, I've been looking forward to both of these for a while. I have one important suggestion regarding Pei Xiu, though:

Tarrot wrote:In 260 Cao Fang rebelled and was killed, Pei Xiu handled the affairs to let Cao Mao become Emperor

This should probably be Cao Mao rebelling (if you can call it that) and Cao Huan/Huang becoming the emperor.
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Re: Chinese Wiki Translations of People of Jin

Unread postby Tarrot » Thu Jul 04, 2013 3:30 am

Thanks, that was a result of doing it before going to bed with my brain fried.
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