A Few Good Men

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A Few Good Men

Unread postby Mega Zarak » Tue Oct 01, 2002 9:42 am

Here're two accounts from SGZ of valiant feats by some brave and loyal souls that lived during the RTK era.

Cao Ren's exploit at Jiang Ling (taken from Cao Ren's SGZ bio)

Zhou Yu led several tens of thousand troops to attack Jiang Ling and the vanguard of several thousands soldiers was near the City of Jiang Ling. Cao Ren mounted the city wall and looked afar for sights of the enemies. Seeing the arrival of the vanguard, Cao Ren proceeded to recruit some 300 soldiers and dispatched Niu Jin to lead them to battle. The enemies were overwhelming in numbers and the troops led by Niu Jin were few. Very soon, Niu Jin was surrounded by the enemies. Chen Qiao, the Chief Secretary or Chang Shi, stood on the city to observe the battle with some of the other officers. They were terrified when they saw Niu Jin's troops became engulfed by the enemies. On the contrary, Cao Ren's anger rose and he shouted for his horse. Seeing that, Chen Qiao and the rest of the officers appealed to Cao Ren, "The enemies were many! It's better to sacrifice the life of the few hundreds than to risk the life of the General!". Cao Ren refused to heed their words. Doning his armour, Cao Ren mounted his horse and handpicked tens of the fitter soldiers under his command and they rode out of the city. When the riders were near the city's moat (some hundred steps away from the enemies), Chen Qiao thought that Cao Ren would position himself there to rally Niu Jin's hard-pressed troops. To his surprise, the riders did not stop. Leading his riders, Cao Ren crossed the moat and dashed right into the enemies encirclement! Niu Jin was soon rescued out of the encirclement. However, some of Niu Jin's troops remained trapped inside. Instead of abandoning them, Cao Ren made repeated dashes to rescue them, killing numerous enemy soldiers along the way. The enemies were forced to retreat soon after. Seeing that Cao Ren had safely returned to the city while successfully rescued Niu Jin despite the overwhelming odds, Chen Qiao and the rest of the officers exclaimed,"The General indeed behaves like a God from the Heaven!". All the three armies were convinced of Cao Ren's courage.

Dong Xi's last deed of loyalty at Ru Xu (taken from Dong Xi's SGZ bio)

When Cao Cao invaded Ru Xu, Dong Xi was tasked by Sun Quan to resist the invaders at Ru Xu. Dong Xi was given command of 5 large galleys (or junks) all of which were to be deployed at the mouth of Ru Xu. During that fateful night, a frightful storm gathered. So terrible was the storm that all the 5 galleys were soon on the verge of sinking. Many of Dong Xi's men were scared and begged Dong Xi to allow them to abandon the galleys and board the smaller vessels to safety. Dong Xi replied angrily,"I was given this responsibility by the General himself and I am supposed to station here to resist those thieves! There is no reason for me to back off this responsibility now. Whoever who mention otherwise will be executed!". As a result, his troops obeyed his order and remained in the galleys. That night, the galleys sunk. Dong Xi, together with his troops, perished in the stormy waters.

Unfortunately, I'm still in the process of finding some interesting stories for Shu generals. Please feel free to contribute more. :D
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Unread postby James » Tue Oct 01, 2002 10:06 pm

Wow, these are great. I love hearing stories like this about officers in the Three Kingdoms era. Personally, events like this are the reason why I am in love with this point in history. :)
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Unread postby Mega Zarak » Wed Oct 02, 2002 2:47 am

Thanks James! :)

Here's another one, this time taken from the Book of Shu, SGZ.

Huo Jun, the man who watched Liu Bei's rear while he took Yi Zhou (taken from Huo Jun's SGZ bio)

When Liu Bei advanced south from the city of Jia Meng to launch a sneak attack on Liu Zhang, Huo Jun was tasked to defend the city against any possible attack. Unfortunately for Huo Jun, most of the troops that Liu Bei brought into Yi Zhou were needed for the southern offensive and not many were left behind for the defence of Jia Meng. Meanwhile, the warlord at Han Zhong, Zhang Lu, had intention of taking Jia Meng and he dispatched his general Yang Bo to the city. On reaching Jia Meng, Yang Bo expressed his willingness to help defending the city, with the obvious intention of deceiving Huo Jun. However, Huo Jun saw through his tricks and replied," I'm just a lowly officer. If you want, you can take my head but you cannot take this city!" Hearing that, Yang Bo was forced to withdraw.

Not long after, two of Liu Zhang's generals, Fu Jin and Xiang Cun, led 10,000+ soldiers up the Lang River and laid siege to Jia Meng. The siege was long and arduous and for more than a year, Huo Jun managed to defend Jia Meng against the attackers. By then, the city was left with only a few hundreds soldiers. The situation was becoming desperate but still Huo Jun did not give up. Finally, opportunity presented itself when the attackers became lax due to the protracted battle. Selecting some of his fittest men, Huo Jun led the contingent out of the city and charged at the enemies who outnumbered him. The attackers were badly defeated by this surprise attack and Xiang Cun was decapitated. As a result, Jia Meng remained safely as part of Liu Bei's territory in Yi Zhou. Huo Jun's perseverence and loyalty was recognised as a crucial factor for the success of Liu Bei's campaign for Yi Zhou.
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Unread postby Dennis » Wed Oct 02, 2002 3:00 am

Wow! Huo Jun is so cool. Too bad he fought for the bad guys!
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Unread postby Mega Zarak » Thu Oct 03, 2002 9:11 am

Another good fella from Shu.

Zhang Yi's last promise (taken from Zhang Yi's SGZ bio with reference to Yi Bu Qi Jiu Zhuan or Biographies of the Venerable Folks in the region of Yi Zhou)

Zhang Yi had always been plagued by a long history of arthritis. Around the time of Yan Xi 17th year, Zhang Yi returned from the frontline at Han Zhong to the capital of Shu, Cheng Du. During then, Zhang Yi's ailment took a turn for the worse. It affected him so badly that he could only stand up with the help of a clutch.

Meanwhile, Wei's commander at Di Dao Pass, Li Jian, sent a secret letter to Shu indicating his willingness to defect to Shu. Many of the court officials doubted Li Jian's offer to surrender but Zhang Yi was confident that the offer was not a ruse. After some consideration, Jiang Wei, the General for Defence (Wei Jiang Jun) of Shu, decided to lead an expedition to capture Long You given the opportunity presented by Li Jian's defection. Since Zhang Yi was still ailing and he only returned from the frontline recently, his desire to join the new expedition was widely opposed. However, Zhang Yi would not relent to the opposition and he begged fervently to be given a chance to serve the nation at the frontline. Finally, his pleas were heeded. Before the army set off to Han Zhong, Zhang Yi submitted a letter of farewell to the ruler of Shu, Liu Shan. The letter read, “While being in your Majesty’s service, I have received more favors from your Majesty than I fairly deserved. With my ailment, I am more disturbed than ever. I fear that the day will come that I die without repaying your Majesty’s kindness adequately. Fortunately, Heaven understands my position and I am now allowed to participate in the impending expedition. If the expedition is victorious and Liang Zhou is captured, I am willing to remain there to defend it for your Majesty. On the other hand, if the expedition ends in failure, I will lay down my life in repayment for your Majesty’s kindness.” Liu Shan was reduced to tears after reading the letter.

True to his words in the letter, Zhang Yi gave all that he had in the expedition. It was to be the last expedition that he ever participated in. Zhang Yi was killed in action while engaging the army led by Wei’s general, Xu Zhi and it was reported that he slain and wounded numerous enemies before resting for eternity.


Sidenote: It was reported that Zhang Yi was highly regarded by the minority tribes in the south and many sobbed on hearing his death. They even erected a temple for him
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Unread postby Sam » Sun Oct 06, 2002 10:44 pm

These are really good great deer. Thanks a lot for posting them, I'm always trying to find out additional information on the net :)
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two brave men

Unread postby Kitsune413 » Mon Oct 07, 2002 6:23 am

Does the SGZ document whether or not Gan Ning's 100 man charge and Zhang Liao's 800 man charge at He Fei actually happened? I'd really like to know if that was true or false. ^__^ if it exists do you think maybe you could translate the account?
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Re: two brave men

Unread postby Zhang Ren » Mon Oct 07, 2002 7:23 am

Kitsune413 wrote:Does the SGZ document whether or not Gan Ning's 100 man charge and Zhang Liao's 800 man charge at He Fei actually happened? I'd really like to know if that was true or false. ^__^ if it exists do you think maybe you could translate the account?


I believe it actually recorded in SGZ, but I am not sure if such account was exaggerated. However, Gan Ning was said to lead 100 horse man to raid Wei's camp at night, his could be more credible since he it was a night raid and he basically attacking unprepare troops.

Most people reading Cao Ren's bio think that he defeated ten of thousands of Wu force with just 300 mens. This is quite false. Cao Ren was only said open a blood route for his men (who was at that time surrounded by Wu's vanguard) to retreat back to JiangLing. Cao Ren's still have the bulk of his troops garrisoned in JiangLing (this lead one to question if the force that Wu send to surround 300 troops was ever that big), however when Gan Ning was attacking YiLing, Cao Ren lead a large number of troops to rescue JiangLing and was defeated by Wu re-enforcement to YiLing and subsequently was forced to abandon JiangLing to Wu. This also lead one to question if Cao Ren was really that good in open field.
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Unread postby Kitsune413 » Mon Oct 07, 2002 7:53 am

Thankies. ^_^
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Re: two brave men

Unread postby Mega Zarak » Mon Oct 07, 2002 9:27 am

Zhang Ren wrote:Most people reading Cao Ren's bio think that he defeated ten of thousands of Wu force with just 300 mens. This is quite false. Cao Ren was only said open a blood route for his men (who was at that time surrounded by Wu's vanguard) to retreat back to JiangLing. Cao Ren's still have the bulk of his troops garrisoned in JiangLing (this lead one to question if the force that Wu send to surround 300 troops was ever that big), however when Gan Ning was attacking YiLing, Cao Ren lead a large number of troops to rescue JiangLing and was defeated by Wu re-enforcement to YiLing and subsequently was forced to abandon JiangLing to Wu. This also lead one to question if Cao Ren was really that good in open field.


Seems like you would like to have a debate whenever Jiang Ling was brought up. Touchy touchy! :lol:

First off, the fact that Cao Ren had to hastily recruit some 300 men when he saw the arrival of the vanguard which numbered several thousands already proved that Jiang Ling did not have that many troops.

Secondly, if Cao Ren was not good in the field, it would only make the rest of Wu looked worse. Hence, it's best if you reconsider your statement! :lol:

Lastly, the reason for starting this thread is mainly to praise the brave and loyal deeds accomplished by people who lived during the Three Kingdoms Era from the historical perspective. I've specifically chosen less-well known deeds as opposed to the more famous ones. Also, the presentation is meant to be from a local context. Hence, the overall ability, morality and other attributes of the generals involved are not being questioned here. :wink:
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