Classical Chinese

Discuss literature (e.g. books, newspapers), educational studies (getting help or opinions on homework or an essay), and philosophy.

Unread postby James » Sat Jun 10, 2006 8:28 pm

Great news, Adrian! :D

Do share any very fun and exciting discoveries you come across with us? I love reading about things like that (I know, I’m strange), as it is the sort of thing you just can’t readily learn much about without dedicating a considerable portion of time to.
Kongming’s Archives – Romance of the Three Kingdoms Novel, History and Games
“ They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”
  — Ben Franklin
User avatar
James
Sausaged Fish
Sausaged Fish
 
Posts: 17949
Joined: Fri Jun 14, 2002 3:21 pm
Location: Happy Valley, UT

Unread postby Liu Yuante » Sun Jun 11, 2006 8:40 pm

James wrote:Great news, Adrian! :D

Do share any very fun and exciting discoveries you come across with us? I love reading about things like that (I know, I’m strange), as it is the sort of thing you just can’t readily learn much about without dedicating a considerable portion of time to.


I definitely will. I'm still not sure which histories he's using - there are several covering this period. Hopefully the official history, the Songshi of Tuo Tuo. I've tracked that down online, now I need to find a paper copy, to which end I need an opinion on something.

http://tinyurl.com/o228q

That is the "25 Histories New Edition - Northern and Southern Song History" published by Zhonghua Shuju, the same folks who publish the official SGZ text. Somewhat recently a project to translate all of the 25 histories into modern Mandarin was completed and I'm concerned that that might be what this is.

http://tinyurl.com/mhf8w

That is "Song History" published by "Chinese Cultural Publishing House".

If anyone knows what these editions are that would be great. Thanks,

Adrian
User avatar
Liu Yuante
绯红王
 
Posts: 2682
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:20 am

Unread postby Liu Yuante » Sat Sep 16, 2006 4:17 pm

Well folks, so far the Song currency records are remarkably easy compared to Sanguo Zhi stuff. I've run up against a reference I do not know, though, and am hoping someone might know the story. At one point the Song dynasty was casting big bronze coins, ostensibly worth ten small but later lowered to twosmall because of counterfeiting and other irregularities. The records note an old man somewhere comparing this to when King Jing of Zhou 周景王 544-520 B.C. had a similar casting policy with large coins. I have never heard of this story he's alluding to and am at a loss to imagine what it could pertain to, at that time there would have been no round coins in China, just spades, cowries and maybe knives, depending on whom you believe. I'm sure I can puzzle it out but if anyone knows their Spring and Autumn Annals real well that can tell me what this King Jing supposedly did it would be a great help. Thanks.

Adrian
User avatar
Liu Yuante
绯红王
 
Posts: 2682
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:20 am

Unread postby Seven at One Stroke » Sat Sep 16, 2006 8:01 pm

LiuYuanTe wrote:Well folks, so far the Song currency records are remarkably easy compared to Sanguo Zhi stuff. I've run up against a reference I do not know, though, and am hoping someone might know the story. At one point the Song dynasty was casting big bronze coins, ostensibly worth ten small but later lowered to twosmall because of counterfeiting and other irregularities. The records note an old man somewhere comparing this to when King Jing of Zhou 周景王 544-520 B.C. had a similar casting policy with large coins. I have never heard of this story he's alluding to and am at a loss to imagine what it could pertain to, at that time there would have been no round coins in China, just spades, cowries and maybe knives, depending on whom you believe. I'm sure I can puzzle it out but if anyone knows their Spring and Autumn Annals real well that can tell me what this King Jing supposedly did it would be a great help. Thanks.

Adrian


I just did a quick search and here are two links:
[1]
[2]

My superficial understanding is this: King Jing of Zhou attempted to mint coins of greater value (大錢) and eliminate the pre-existing "small coins" (coins of smaller denomiation) from circulation [modern comparison: if the US starts minting $2 coins and make the coins of smaller denomination obsolete]. I don't know much about econmics, but my guess is that this would ostensibly inflate the values of common commodities. The second link has a more serious look at the change of the structural role of coins in pre-modern China, but it's beyond my meager understanding of economics.

According to the dumbed down history in the first link, after King Jing of Zhou went ahead with the "big coins," his country was thrown into chaos for five years, although he passed away a year after his policy changes went into effect.

I'm not sure if this helps. :?

P.S. Even though we call it "coin" here, the Chinese counterpart isn't necessarily disc-shaped.

Here is the original quote from Guo Yu

景王二十一年,將鑄大錢。單穆公曰:“不可。古者,天災降戾,于是乎量資幣,權輕重,以振救民,民患輕,則為作重幣以行之,于是乎有母權子而行,民皆得焉。若不堪重,則多作輕而行之,亦不廢重,于是乎有子權母而行,小大利之。
“今王廢輕而作重,民失其資,能無匱乎?若匱,王用將有所乏,乏則將厚取于民。民不給,將有遠志,是離民也。且夫備有未至而設之,有至後救之,是不相入也,可先而不備,謂之怠;可後而先之,謂之召災。周固羸國,天未厭禍焉,而又離民以佐災,無乃不可乎?將民之與處而離之,將災是備御而召之,則何以經國?國無經,何以出令?令之不從,上之患也,故聖人樹德于民以除之。
“《夏書》有之曰:‘關石、和鈞,王府則有。’《詩》亦有之曰:“瞻彼旱麓,榛楛濟濟。愷悌君子,干祿愷悌。‘夫旱麓之榛楛殖,故君子得以易樂干祿焉。若夫山林匱竭,林麓散亡,藪澤肆既,民力凋盡,田疇荒蕪,資用乏匱,君子將險哀之不暇,而何易樂之有焉?
“且絕民用以實王府,猶塞川原而為潢污也,其竭也無日矣。若民離而財匱,災至而備亡,王其若之何?吾周官之于災備也,其所怠棄者多矣,而又奪之資,以益其災,是去其藏而翳其人也。王其圖之!”
王弗聽,卒鑄大錢。

link
Moderation in pursuit of actual work is no vice.
User avatar
Seven at One Stroke
Sei's Slave
 
Posts: 1852
Joined: Wed Oct 02, 2002 4:16 am

Unread postby Liu Yuante » Sun Sep 17, 2006 2:06 am

That helps a ton 7 @ 1. And yeah, I know that Chinese currency in the early times was not coin-shaped. The first round coins were introduced circa 4th-century B.C., possibly the first Ban Liang coins of the Qin state in 378 B.C. Whether the round coins of Yan, Qi and Wei were earlier or not is still completely unclear. Spades, knives and cowries, as well as gold blocks in Chu state, predominated originally. What I was trying to express, is that knives and spades are much larger and more unwieldy, so making a larger, more valuable "coin" is a stranger proposition. I'll have to check my copy of Cast Chinese Coins for size variations of the same spade type.

And yes, unlike modern currencies which are almost all fiduciary (the actual material's value is irrelevant) in ancient Chinese times the people did not go for this type of currency at all. In the song dynasty scenario, considerably later on, the coins supposedly worth ten small coins were actually only comprised of three small coins' worth of bronze, so they were really overvalued and this caused a lot of trouble. But anyhow, yes, this helps immensely. Thanks!


EDIT: The Song records mention an illness here so I think the fact that King Jing died a year after instituting the reforms is key. Also, to clarify my statement about spade coins, though in the Warring States period the spades were smallish - not as small as round coins but still small, maybe 35-60 mm - back in the Spring & Autumn period the known spade coins were much bigger and heavier, still far removed from the original agricultural implements that spawned them but still quite clunky.

Adrian
User avatar
Liu Yuante
绯红王
 
Posts: 2682
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:20 am

Unread postby Sun Gongli » Mon Sep 18, 2006 2:10 am

Can someone help me translate Yuan Shu's SGZ biography?

(1) - Annotations
(I) - Translator's notes

Yuan Shu (袁術), styled Gonglu (公路), 司空逢子, was (Yuan) Shao's (袁紹) cousin. 以俠氣聞. 舉孝廉, 除郎中, 歷職內外, 後為折衝校尉, 虎賁中郎將. Dong Zhuo (董卓) dethroned the emperor and raised Yuan Shu to act as General; Yuan Shu feared Dong Zhuo's tyranny and fled to Nanyang (南陽). Sun Jian (孫堅), the prefect of Changsha (長沙), killed Zhang Zi (張咨), the prefect of Nanyang, and Shu seized the commandery. Nanyang's households numbered one million, and in order to support his licentious lifestyle, Yuan Shu excessively taxed the peasants, bringing them much suffering. Since Yuan Shu bore a grudge against Yuan Shao, who had allied with Liu Biao (劉表), Yuan Shu in turn allied with Gongsun Zan (公孫瓚) to the north. This was because Yuan Shao and Gongsun Zan were on bad terms and Liu Biao was to Yuan Shu's south. The two relatives harbored ill feelings for one another, and soon entered conflict with one another. (1) (I) The Grand Progenitor's (Cao Cao) (曹操) army entered Chenliu (陳留) and participated with Yuan Shao on a joint attack on Yuan Shu, dealing him a crushing defeat. Shu fled to Jiujiang (九江) with the remnants of his forces and slew the Governor of Yangzhou (揚州), Chen Wen (陳溫), and took over the province. (2) Then, Zhang Xun (張勳) and Qiao Rui (橋蕤) were promoted to the rank of Great General. Li Jue (李傕) entered Changan (長安) and wished to make ties with Yuan Shu for mutual assistance, and promised to appoint Yuan Shu as General of the Right and confer upon him the marquisate of Yangdi, and thus sent the Imperial Tutor Ma Ridi (馬日磾), who procrastinated in honoring Shu. Shu thus detained Ridi and did not allow him to leave. (3)

(1) Wu Shu says: When it was discovered that Emperor Ling had passed away, it resulted in rebellion in the empire, as Emperor Shao was young and weak, and the Eunuchs and the clan of the Emperor's mother ran the court. The Governor of Youzhou (幽州), Liu Yu (劉虞), was virtuous and prestigious, and Shao's desire at the time was to enthrone him, and some people reported this to Shu. Shu felt that the House of Liu was in decline, and he made secret subversive plans, and thus joined with Yuan Shao under the pretense of fighting in the name of righteousness. Shao's correspondence to Shu said: "前與韓文節共建永世之道, 欲海內見再興之主. Now in the west, there is a child emperor without the support of relatives, and now all in the court are loyal to Dong Zhuo, 安可復信! 但當使兵往屯關要, 皆自蹙死于西. 東立聖君, 太平可冀, 如何有疑! 又室家見戮, 不念子胥, 可復北面乎? 違天不祥, 願詳思之." Shu responded: "聖主聰叡,有周成之質.又室家見戮, 有周成之質. That villain (Dong) Zhuo is the cause of the current chaos and suffering, 威服百寮, 此乃漢家小厄之會. 亂尚未厭, 復欲興之. 乃云今主'無血脈之屬,' 豈不誣乎! 先人以來, 奕世相承, 忠義為先. 太傅公仁慈惻隱, 雖知賊卓必為禍害, 以信徇義, 不忍去也. 門戶滅絕, 死亡流漫, 幸蒙遠近來相赴助, 不因此時上討國賊, 下刷家恥, 而圖於此, 非所聞也. 又曰 '室家見戮, 可復北面,' 此卓所為, 豈國家哉? 君命, 天也, 天不可讎, 況非君命乎! Our loyalty and spirit is directed at eliminating (Dong) Zhuo. Do not be ignorant of that."

(2) Your Servant Pei Songzhi 案英雄 Records: "Chen Wen styled Yuan Ti (元悌) and was a man from Runan (汝南). While serving as governor of Yangzhou, he took ill and died. Yuan Shao sent Yuan Yi (袁遺) to take over the province, but he was defeated and fled to the Pei country, where his soldiers killed him. Yuan Shu used Chen Yu (陳瑀) to replace Chen Wen. Wen styled Gongwei (公瑋) and was from Xiapei (下邳). 瑀既領州, 而術敗于封丘, south towards Shou Chun, Yu refused to accept Shu. 術退保陰陵, gathered his forces and attacked Yu. Yu fled back to Xiapei." Thus, (Chen) Wen was not slain by Yuan Shu, and the biographies do not agree.

(3) 三輔決錄注曰: "(Ma) Ridi styled Wengshu (翁叔) and was the son of Ma Rong (馬融). 少傳融業, 以才學進. He was classmates with Yang Biao, Lu Zhi, and Cai Yong, was one of the Nine Ministers, and reached the position of Tutor. 獻帝春秋曰, "術從日磾借節觀之, 因奪不還, 備軍中千餘人, 使促辟之." 日磾謂術曰, "卿家先世諸公, 辟士云何, 而言促之, 謂公府掾可劫得乎!" 從術求去, 而術留之不遣; 既以失節屈辱, 憂恚而死.

時沛相下邳陳珪, 故太尉球弟子也. 術與珪俱公族子孫, 少共交游, 書與珪曰, "昔秦失其政, 天下群雄爭而取之, 兼智勇者卒受其歸. 今世事紛擾, 復有瓦解之勢矣, 誠英乂有為之時也. 與足下舊交, 豈肯左右之乎? 若集大事, 子實為吾心膂." 珪中子應時在下邳, 術並脅質應, 圖必致珪. 珪答書曰, "昔秦末世, 肆暴恣情, 虐流天下, 毒被生民, 下不堪命, 故遂土崩. 今雖季世, 未有亡秦苛暴之亂也. 曹將軍神武應期, 興復典刑, 將撥平凶慝, 清定海內, 信有徵矣. 以為足下當戮力同心, 匡翼漢室, 而陰謀不軌, 以身試禍, 豈不痛哉@ 若迷而知反, 尚可以免. 吾備舊知, 故陳至情, 雖逆于耳, 骨肉之惠也. 欲吾營私阿附, 有犯死不能也."

In winter of the second year of Xing Ping, 天子敗於曹陽. Shu gathered his subordinates and said, "Now, the Liu clan is weak, and the world is in turmoil. My family has served for four generations, 百姓所歸, 欲應天順民, what are your opinions?" No one dared to agree. The Master of Records, Yan Xiang, offered, "Since the days of the Zhou, 后稷至于文王, 積德累功, 三分天下有其二, 猶服事殷. 明公雖奕世克昌, 未若有周之盛, 漢室雖微, 未若殷紂之暴也." Shu was displeased. He used Zhang Jiong (張炯) of Henei's (河內) omen of a prince ascending to the throne as a justification to usurp the title of Emperor (4) and used the head of Jiujiang to act as official of Huainan (淮南). He installed high ranking officials, 祠南北郊. Famine and Yuan Shu's extravagance both grew. His concubines numbered in the hundreds and all wore woven silk clothes; he received extra food; (5) his soldiers went cold and hungry. The lands of the Yangtze and Huai rivers became infertile, the people turned to cannibalism. Yuan Shu suffered defeat at the hands of Lü Bu (呂布), 後為太祖所敗, and fled to Lei Bo (雷薄) and Chen Lan (陳蘭) 于灊山, 憂懼不知所出. He sought to relinquish the title of Emperor to (Yuan) Shao and fled towards Qingzhou (青州). Yuan Shao, in turn, sent his son Yuan Tan (袁譚), but Shu died of illness. (6) His family fled to Yuan Shu's prefect of Lujiang, Liu Xun (劉勳). Sun Ce (孫策) destroyed Xun's forces, (II) 復見收視. Shu's daughter entered the palace of Sun Quan (孫權), and his son Yuan Yao (袁燿) received the rank of Secretary-General. Yao's daughter was betrothed to Sun Quan's son, Sun Fen (孫奮).

(4) Dian Lue says: Shu used his surname to explain, 陳, 舜之後, 以土承火, 得應運之次. 又見讖文云: "代漢者, 當塗高也."自以名字當之, 乃建號稱仲氏.

(5) 九州春秋曰: 司隸馮方女, 國色也, 避亂揚州, 術登城見而悅之, 遂納焉, 甚愛幸. 諸婦害其寵, 語之曰, "將軍貴人有志節, 當時時涕泣憂愁, 必長見敬重." 馮氏以為然, 後見術輒垂涕, 術以有心志, 益哀之. 諸婦人因共絞殺, 懸之廁梁, 術誠以為不得志而死, 乃厚加殯斂."

(6) Wei Shu says: 術歸帝號于紹曰: "漢之失天下久矣, 天子提挈, 政在家門, 豪雄角逐, 分裂疆宇, 此與周之末年七國分勢無異, 卒彊者兼之耳. 加袁氏受命當王, 符瑞炳然, 今君擁有四州, 民戶百萬, 以彊則無與比大, 論德則無與比高. 曹操欲扶衰拯弱, 安能續絕命救已滅乎?" 紹陰然之. Wu Shu says: 術既為雷薄等所拒, 留住三日, 士眾絕糧, 乃還至江亭, 去壽春八十里. 問廚下, 尚有麥屑三十斛. 時盛暑, 欲得蜜漿, 又無蜜. 坐櫺床上, 歎息良久, 乃大吒曰, "袁術至于此乎!" 因頓伏床下, 嘔血斗餘而死.

(I) The conflicts between Yuan Shao and Yuan Shu started at Yangcheng (陽城), which was under the protection of Sun Jian during his time serving in the coalition against Dong Zhuo. Sun Jian was fighting Lü Bu and Dong Zhuo at Luoyang (洛陽) at the time and was able to defeat them and conquer the city. He then went back, and in conjunction with Yuan Shu and Gongsun Zan, defeated Yuan Shao and retook Yangcheng. Sun Jian would then die at Xiangyang (襄陽) whilst fighting Liu Biao on Yuan Shu's behalf. Sun Jian's death, and Cao Cao's conquest of Nanyang, brought about an informal end to the struggle between Yuan Shao and Yuan Shu.

(II) Sun Ce served Yuan Shu meritoriously and was the closest of friends with Qiao Rui and Zhang Xun. He had been one of the strongest objectors to Yuan Shu's initial musings of taking the throne, and to that end, he wrote a lengthy letter absolving the young Emperor Xian of any connection to Dong Zhuo. Yuan Shu pretended to accept the advice of Yan Xiang and Sun Ce, but inwardly, he was greatly upset. Later, when he claimed the title of Emperor, Sun Ce deserted him and took the lands of Jiang Dong with him. It is said that after Yuan Shu's death, Zhang Xun, Yang Hong, and others sought to submit to Sun Ce, but were captured by Cao Cao before they had the chance.

The original:

袁術字公路,司空逢子,紹之從弟也。以俠氣聞。舉孝廉,除郎中,歷職內外,後為折衝校尉、虎賁中郎將。董卓之將廢帝,以術為後將軍;術亦畏卓之禍,出奔南陽。會長沙太守孫堅殺南陽太守張咨,術得據其郡。南陽戶口數百萬,而術奢淫肆欲,徵斂無度,百姓苦之。既與紹有隙,又與劉表不平而北連公孫瓚;紹與瓚不和而南連劉表。其兄弟攜貳,舍近交遠如此。〔一〕引軍入陳留。太祖與紹合擊,大破術軍。術以餘眾奔九江,殺揚州刺史陳溫,領其州。〔二〕以張勳、橋蕤等為大將軍。李傕入長安,欲結術為援,以術為左將軍,封陽翟侯,假節,遣太傅馬日磾因循行拜授。術奪日磾節,拘留不遣。〔三〕

〔一〕 吳書曰:時議者以靈帝失道,使天下叛亂,少帝幼弱,為賊臣所立,又不識母氏所出。幽州牧劉虞宿有德望,紹等欲立之以安當時,使人報術。術觀漢室衰陵,陰懷異志,故外託公義以拒紹。紹復與術書曰:「前與韓文節共建永世之道,欲海內見再興之主。今西名有幼君,無血脈之屬,公卿以下皆媚事卓,安可復信!但當使兵往屯關要,皆自蹙死于西。東立聖君,太平可冀,如何有疑!又室家見戮,不念子胥,可復北面乎?違天不祥,願詳思之。」術答曰:「聖主聰叡,有周成之質。賊卓因危亂之際,威服百寮,此乃漢家小厄之會。亂尚未厭,復欲興之。乃云今主『無血脈之屬』,豈不誣乎!先人以來,奕世相承,忠義為先。太傅公仁慈惻隱,雖知賊卓必為禍害,以信徇義,不忍去也。門戶滅絕,死亡流漫,幸蒙遠近來相赴助,不因此時上討國賊,下刷家恥,而圖於此,非所聞也。又曰『室家見戮,可復北面』,此卓所為,豈國家哉?君命,天也,天不可讎,況非君命乎!慺慺赤心,志在滅卓,不識其他。」

〔二〕 臣松之案英雄記:「陳溫字元悌,汝南人。先為揚州刺史,自病死。袁紹遣袁遺領州,敗散,奔沛國,為兵所殺。袁術更用陳瑀為揚州。瑀字公瑋,下邳人。瑀既領州,而術敗于封丘,南向壽春,瑀拒術不納。術退保陰陵,更合軍攻瑀,瑀懼走歸下邳。」如此,則溫不為術所殺,與本傳不同。

〔三〕 三輔決錄注曰:日磾字翁叔,馬融之族子。少傳融業,以才學進。與楊彪、盧植、蔡邕等典校中書,歷位九卿,遂登台輔。獻帝春秋曰:術從日磾借節觀之,因奪不還,備軍中千餘人,使促辟之。日磾謂術曰:「卿家先世諸公,辟士云何,而言促之,謂公府掾可劫得乎!」從術求去,而術留之不遣;既以失節屈辱,憂恚而死。

  時沛相下邳陳珪,故太尉球弟子也。術與珪俱公族子孫,少共交游,書與珪曰:「昔秦失其政,天下群雄爭而取之,兼智勇者卒受其歸。今世事紛擾,復有瓦解之勢矣,誠英乂有為之時也。與足下舊交,豈肯左右之乎?若集大事,子實為吾心膂。」珪中子應時在下邳,術並脅質應,圖必致珪。珪答書曰:「昔秦末世,肆暴恣情,虐流天下,毒被生民,下不堪命,故遂土崩。今雖季世,未有亡秦苛暴之亂也。曹將軍神武應期,興復典刑,將撥平凶慝,清定海內,信有徵矣。以為足下當戮力同心,匡翼漢室,而陰謀不軌,以身試禍,豈不痛哉!若迷而知反,尚可以免。吾備舊知,故陳至情,雖逆于耳,骨肉之惠也。欲吾營私阿附,有犯死不能也。」

  興平二年冬,天子敗於曹陽。術會群下謂曰:「今劉氏微弱,海內鼎沸。吾家四世公輔,百姓所歸,欲應天順民,於諸君意如何?」眾莫敢對。主簿閻象進曰:「昔周自后稷至于文王,積德累功,三分天下有其二,猶服事殷。明公雖奕世克昌,未若有周之盛,漢室雖微,未若殷紂之暴也。」術嘿然不悅。用河內張炯之符命,遂僭號〔一〕以九江太守為淮南尹。置公卿,祠南北郊。荒侈滋甚,後宮數百皆服綺縠,餘粱肉,〔二〕而士卒凍餒,江淮閒空盡,人民相食。術前為呂布所破,後為太祖所敗,奔其部曲雷薄、陳蘭于灊山,復為所拒,憂懼不知所出。將歸帝號於紹,欲至青州從袁譚,發病道死。〔三〕妻子依術故吏廬江太守劉勳,孫策破勳,復見收視。術女入孫權宮,子燿拜郎中,燿女又配於權子奮。

〔一〕 典略曰:術以袁姓出陳,陳,舜之後,以土承火,得應運之次。又見讖文云:「代漢者,當塗高也。」自以名字當之,乃建號稱仲氏。

〔二〕 九州春秋曰:司隸馮方女,國色也,避亂揚州,術登城見而悅之,遂納焉,甚愛幸。諸婦害其寵,語之曰:「將軍貴人有志節,當時時涕泣憂愁,必長見敬重。」馮氏以為然,後見術輒垂涕,術以有心志,益哀之。諸婦人因共絞殺,懸之廁梁,術誠以為不得志而死,乃厚加殯斂。

〔三〕 魏書曰:術歸帝號于紹曰:「漢之失天下久矣,天子提挈,政在家門,豪雄角逐,分裂疆宇,此與周之末年七國分勢無異,卒彊者兼之耳。加袁氏受命當王,符瑞炳然。今君擁有四州,民戶百萬,以彊則無與比大,論德則無與比高。曹操欲扶衰拯弱,安能續絕命救已滅乎?」紹陰然之。吳書曰:術既為雷薄等所拒,留住三日,士眾絕糧,乃還至江亭,去壽春八十里。問廚下,尚有麥屑三十斛。時盛暑,欲得蜜漿,又無蜜。坐櫺床上,歎息良久,乃大吒曰:「袁術至于此乎!」因頓伏床下,嘔血斗餘而死。
Last edited by Sun Gongli on Tue Sep 19, 2006 1:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"There are those who try to shape the world to their own whim,
and then there are those who allow the world to shape them.
It is in the balance that greatness is achieved."
User avatar
Sun Gongli
Poo Poo Pants
 
Posts: 4058
Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2004 2:56 am
Location: Spies destroy everything I create!

Unread postby Liu Yuante » Tue Sep 19, 2006 12:34 am

Wow is his Bio really that short? I would never have thought. I don't have a lot of time to devote to other translation work right now but if I get a spare moment I'll take a glance over some of it and see if I can offer some suggestions.

Adrian
User avatar
Liu Yuante
绯红王
 
Posts: 2682
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:20 am

Unread postby Liu Yuante » Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:45 pm

I've sent the first portion of my Song Dynasty currency records to David Hartill, dealing with everything up to the reign of Huizong, and David wrote back saying: "After just a quick glance, I can say that this is vastly
superior to anything else I have ever seen on the subject."

Woohoo!

Adrian
User avatar
Liu Yuante
绯红王
 
Posts: 2682
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:20 am

Unread postby Seven at One Stroke » Sun Dec 10, 2006 2:13 am

LiuYuanTe wrote:I've sent the first portion of my Song Dynasty currency records to David Hartill, dealing with everything up to the reign of Huizong, and David wrote back saying: "After just a quick glance, I can say that this is vastly
superior to anything else I have ever seen on the subject."

Woohoo!

Adrian


Woohoo indeed. Good job. :D
Moderation in pursuit of actual work is no vice.
User avatar
Seven at One Stroke
Sei's Slave
 
Posts: 1852
Joined: Wed Oct 02, 2002 4:16 am

Re: Classical Chinese

Unread postby Liu Yuante » Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:22 pm

*utters necromantic incantations*

So...nifty little tool I found. More convenient than the Kingsoft PowerWord utility, and also free (for the standard version), but less robust, perhaps, is the MDGB Chinese Reader: http://usa.mdbg.net/chindict/chindict.p ... ry_windows.

When active, all you do is mouseover a chinese character in Simplified or Traditional character sets and it pops up definitions and information, similar to what you get using the lookup or annotate tools on the MDGB website.
It does not have an in-depth dictionary, with multitudes of entries, that you can pull up separately for each character, but it also is easier to use for native English-speakers, as the most recent version of PowerWord is entirely in Chinese (with the exception of the definitions, of course).

Adrian
User avatar
Liu Yuante
绯红王
 
Posts: 2682
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:20 am

PreviousNext

Return to Literature, Academics, and Philosophy

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Copyright © 2002–2008 Kongming’s Archives. All Rights Reserved