Scientific Questions Thread

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Unread postby Ranbir » Tue Apr 20, 2004 9:21 pm

In regard too

Particles are predictable- one can find the area that they will be in and one can find their speed. If they were chaotic, it would be impossible to find out anything about them, as they would simply be random.


But Chaos plays a big big part. Check Quantum chaos.

I'll give you a point from which you can start from, and that is the Uncertainty Principle. This prevents us from talking about initial conditions in quantum mechanics since we cannot know the position and velocity of a particle simulataneously. The same principle also prevents us talking about trajectories in quantum mechanics because a trajectory is nothing more than a complete description of the position and velocity of a particle at all times.

We can observe a particles position at a certain time, and we can predict the future position from the past data. However, the past of any observed state of a physical system can be mapped in innumerable different ways, giving rise to innumerable different futures.

Could this thread be made into a sticky?
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Unread postby Ranbir » Thu Oct 07, 2004 11:05 pm

Why yes it can Ranbir.

Please use this for questions strictly related to science.
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Unread postby Harimau » Fri Oct 08, 2004 6:40 am

Math is science too! Anyway, i have an embarassing question... Even after doing this stuff for more than a year now, i actually never knew how to do a very simple vector question. That is, how do you find the distance between vectors in R3?

(When the vectors are in the form x = z + by , where x, y and z are vectors in R3, and b is a scalar.

I know you have to use projections, and i memorized the process of doing these sort of questions, but i never actually understood it.

Another question would be the Central Limit Theorem. What are the restrictions on using this theorem?
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Unread postby Ranbir » Fri Oct 08, 2004 9:34 am

Science is maths you mean. Yeah, I should rename this to maths.

Anyway, as soon as my dad gets back from work, I'll have answers to your questions!
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Unread postby Harimau » Fri Oct 15, 2004 11:14 am

Ranbir wrote:Science is maths you mean. Yeah, I should rename this to maths.

Anyway, as soon as my dad gets back from work, I'll have answers to your questions!


*whine*

Anyway, another question:

for x_i > 0, p_i > 0 and k > 1, prove the following:

[Sum from i = 1 to n] (p_i)*(x_i) > ( [Sum from i = 1 to n] (p_i)*(x_i)^k )^(1/k)* ([Sum from i = 1 to n] p_i))^(1/k')

Where (1/k) + (1/k') = 1
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Unread postby Ranbir » Fri Oct 15, 2004 12:33 pm

Yeah sorry, Hari. My parents aren't that great at Vector stuff. Neither am I.

And I did forget about telling you. Sorry! :cry:

Calculus! That's what my dad does! I can get help for that!

What do you mean by x_i ?
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Unread postby Harimau » Fri Oct 15, 2004 2:14 pm

Ranbir wrote:Yeah sorry, Hari. My parents aren't that great at Vector stuff. Neither am I.

And I did forget about telling you. Sorry! :cry:

Calculus! That's what my dad does! I can get help for that!

What do you mean by x_i ?


x subscript i. As in x_1, x_2, and so on until x_n...
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Unread postby Equinox » Fri Oct 15, 2004 2:52 pm

Something I never quite figured out: do you age at a different rate on prolonged stays out of the planet (in spacecrafts, on other planets)? Is aging is directly affected by being on Earth?
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Unread postby Ranbir » Fri Oct 15, 2004 3:15 pm

I don't think aging is affected by where you are.

I came across this, "mechanisms of aging"

http://www.benbest.com/lifeext/aging.html

EDIT: Hari, I've given the prob, he said he can back to me by tomorrow. I don't know if that's too late though, since you're nearly a day ahead. :?
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Unread postby fantasycrusader » Tue Nov 16, 2004 1:21 pm

Equinox wrote:Something I never quite figured out: do you age at a different rate on prolonged stays out of the planet (in spacecrafts, on other planets)? Is aging is directly affected by being on Earth?


Hmm.....Einstein had a theory about something.....

If you travel at the speed of light, time slows down. So I guess if you really can, you won't age that fast. [O.o]

I know I didn't really answer ya question, but I thought it was a fun tibit. ^_^

Ranir wrote:I'll give you a point from which you can start from, and that is the Uncertainty Principle. This prevents us from talking about initial conditions in quantum mechanics since we cannot know the position and velocity of a particle simulataneously.


Yea. I can back him on this. Take the example of a candle flame. If I were to pose the question of, "Where is the candle flame?" t you, it's not really possible to answer it accurately as the candle flame is "more" in some places and "less" in others.
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