Theological perspective quiz

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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Zhuanyong » Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:46 pm

Sun Fin wrote:We've already had that discussion once in this thread... :lol:


I know, I just read it. :lol: I find talking about the scriptures to be both edifying, soothing, & enlightening. Probably the only other thing that I get even close to that much enjoyment out of is sports.
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Sun Fin » Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:54 pm

Considering I'm just writing a concluding essay on the topic of Christian Doctrine I decided to re-take the test now I have a better understanding of theology. While the top 2 haven't changed (I'm still in the Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan bracket) I've grown more comfortable with some Catholic ideas whilst becoming much less in touch with the Charasmatic movement which I find surprising since I am attending a Pentacostal church and generally like charasmatic, evangelical churches.

You Scored as Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan
You are an evangelical in the Wesleyan tradition. You believe that God's grace enables you to choose to believe in him, even though you yourself are totally depraved. The gift of the Holy Spirit gives you assurance of your salvation, and he also enables you to live the life of obedience to which God has called us. You are influenced heavly by John Wesley and the Methodists.


Neo orthodox
79%
Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan
79%
Fundamentalist
64%
Roman Catholic
57%
Reformed Evangelical
57%
Emergent/Postmodern
54%
Classical Liberal
43%
Charismatic/Pentecostal
36%
Modern Liberal
14%
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby TooMuchBaijiu » Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:57 pm

WeiWenDi wrote:Hehe - TMBJ, you're making me curious about the 'damn good reasons'! I'm not going to try to re-convert you or anything; I myself have actually stormed out of a church during the middle of worship never to come back, so if anything I'd be more likely to sympathise...

I am surprised at the high Emergent/PoMo score, though, especially since whenever I pull out a PoMo / post-liberal mode of argumentation in our arguments, you tend to kind of laugh it off. :D


Been five months, but what the hell.

I left because I didn't like being told that ideas, concepts, and beliefs were fundamentally wrong because they didn't adhere to their perspective. I mean it was practically "la la la la not compatible with true Christian doctine!" I also didn't like being told that the people who believed or espoused such ideas were fundamentally wrong. That 'hate the sin, love the sinner' sounded more and more like an easy out every time I heard it. I also didn't like how their doctrine was rigid, unquestionable, absolute, and clueless. I remember being told in the same breath how God gives us a choice whether to choose Him or to reject Him, and at the same time He knew the choice we would make. I came to the conclusion that according to these people, God created us knowing that many of us would be destined to be condemned to hell.

...but He loves us.

Also, I disagreed with the views held by much of the congregation on more temporal matters. Once I asked some of the more outspoken members that if God really wanted us in Iraq, how many airstrikes did he think Jesus would call? Yeah, that was a hit.

And so I tried going Catholic (my Dad's religion) for a bit, and while it wasn't so bad for me, I just didn't develop much of a spiritual connection. Eventually I decided that I wasn't big on this whole Jesus-was-a-divine-being bit, and that I could develop a better spiritual connection on Sunday mornings with dime bags and Zig Zags. I grew out of the latter sentiment, but the former stayed with me. Started reading the Tao Te Ching when I was nineteen. Made more sense to me than anything that came before it.

So, when did you pull off PoMo/Postliberal arguments on me?
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Zhuanyong » Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:14 pm

I retook the test as well. I didn't really know who Karl Barth or Bishop Spong were and had to pick a neutral answer then on some of the question accordingly.

My second scoring is:

You Scored as Fundamentalist
You are a fundamentalist. You take the Bible as the foundation of your faith and read it very literally, and it shapes your worldview. Non-fundamentalist Christians have watered-down the Gospel in your view, and academic study of the Bible stops us from 'taking God at his word.' Science is opposed to faith, as it contradicts basic biblical truths.

Fundamentalist
68%
Classical Liberal
64%
Emergent/Postmodern
64%
Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan
61%
Modern Liberal
57%
Charismatic/Pentecostal
54%
Neo orthodox
50%
Reformed Evangelical
25%
Roman Catholic
21%

I'm not surprised of the lowest scoring denominations as I disagree highly with the Roman Catholic dogma.

EDIT: My Roman Catholic score was actually lower the first time? :shock: I suppose this test is hard to gauge my belief system as I'm not a Christian and some of those questions I wouldn't necessarily have an agreeable opinion of because I don't believe in certain things.
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Lady Chen » Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:19 pm

I just wanted to say that it says a lot about this group of people to see such a respectful debate happen in a religious thread of all places. :)

Now if only we could all get along when talking about sports ... LOL!
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Sun Fin » Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:23 pm

Well some of those questions are phrased very poorly.

For example:

'Jesus was an example of a good life.' (ish how it was phrased)

Well yes I do agree with that statement but I also think he was far more than that but I still clicked Agree.

Or

'Is homosexuality the worse sin'

I clicked strongly disagree, cos I believe all sins are equal but that probably mislead the quiz too.

So my results aren't perfect but no quiz is ever going to be is it?
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Zhuanyong » Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:27 pm

Sun Fin wrote:Well some of those questions are phrased very poorly.

For example:

'Jesus was an example of a good life.' (ish how it was phrased)

Well yes I do agree with that statement but I also think he was far more than that but I still clicked Agree.

Or

'Is homosexuality the worse sin'

I clicked strongly disagree, cos I believe all sins are equal but that probably mislead the quiz too.

So my results aren't perfect but no quiz is ever going to be is it?


I concur. Especially with the latter. I sat there for a few seconds and then had to a select an answer that probably didn't fit the fact that while I consider it a sin which is an abomination according to the scriptures, it is not the worst sin.

Lady Chen wrote:I just wanted to say that it says a lot about this group of people to see such a respectful debate happen in a religious thread of all places. :)


It is very respectful.

Lady Chen wrote:Now if only we could all get along when talking about sports ... LOL!


:lol: No. :lol:
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby WeiWenDi » Sun Nov 20, 2011 12:56 am

Lady Chen wrote:What an interesting quiz! Thank you to whoever originally shared it. I can't say that my results were at all surprising. One of the things I like the most about my church is the focus on social justice.

My favorite book in the Bible is James. I especially like the commentary on faith and deeds -- that we must show our faith through our deeds -- and that a focus on love and purity is more important than ceremony or formalism.


'Faith without works is dead' - a sentiment I can certainly agree with! 'The devils also believe, and tremble!' Another good passage expressing the same sentiment is in first Corinthians 13: 'Though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing'.

That said - perhaps Daoism wasn't as good a description of my own beliefs as Confucianism would be. I really do think that the ceremony and the formalism, when done right, renew love and good works in faith, with the Eucharist as a divine drama by which the gifts of God are shared eternally. Even if the basis of charity and humanity is there, it has to be upbuilt and cultivated before one can reap the harvest.

Lady Chen wrote:Can anyone tell me what the difference between modern liberalism and classic liberalism is?


Don't quote me on this one, since I could be wrong; however, I was taught that classical liberalism tends to be defined by the practice of higher criticism and draws primarily from the German Enlightenment theology, whereas modern liberalism has been more influenced by the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and theologians such as John Cobb, Jr.

TooMuchBaijiu wrote:I left because I didn't like being told that ideas, concepts, and beliefs were fundamentally wrong because they didn't adhere to their perspective. I mean it was practically "la la la la not compatible with true Christian doctine!" I also didn't like being told that the people who believed or espoused such ideas were fundamentally wrong. That 'hate the sin, love the sinner' sounded more and more like an easy out every time I heard it. I also didn't like how their doctrine was rigid, unquestionable, absolute, and clueless. I remember being told in the same breath how God gives us a choice whether to choose Him or to reject Him, and at the same time He knew the choice we would make. I came to the conclusion that according to these people, God created us knowing that many of us would be destined to be condemned to hell.

...but He loves us.

Also, I disagreed with the views held by much of the congregation on more temporal matters. Once I asked some of the more outspoken members that if God really wanted us in Iraq, how many airstrikes did he think Jesus would call? Yeah, that was a hit.

And so I tried going Catholic (my Dad's religion) for a bit, and while it wasn't so bad for me, I just didn't develop much of a spiritual connection. Eventually I decided that I wasn't big on this whole Jesus-was-a-divine-being bit, and that I could develop a better spiritual connection on Sunday mornings with dime bags and Zig Zags. I grew out of the latter sentiment, but the former stayed with me. Started reading the Tao Te Ching when I was nineteen. Made more sense to me than anything that came before it.


Interesting - this is a pretty familiar story to me. The 'hate the sin, love the sinner' bromide all too often is an easy way out psychologically for people who just don't want to deal with certain issues. Even taking homosexuality as a sin, the way in which homosexuals are too often treated by Christians who supposedly 'love' them must be considered an even greater one. I've had to deal with a couple of people who routinely confused their own prejudices for the will of God... not too fun.

Also, props for the George Carlin reference! 'And he NEEDS MONEY!' :lol:

Personally, though, I came to the conclusion that the doctrines, the orthodoxy, were what make the religion both interesting and true, at least when explained by people who know what they're talking about. If there is a fundamental nature, a Dao, to the universe - I believe it is scientifically necessary to come to terms with grace, the overwhelming, self-immolating outpouring of physical energy in nature from (in our case) the Sun, which literally sustains everything we do and demands nothing in return (in fact, there is nothing we can do to repay what we have been given, because everything we can do is contingent first upon this outpouring of energy). Even though Mr Carlin sort of stops there, I think one could stand to go a bit further...

If there is a way in which human beings can gain a connexion with the divine nature, with the Dao, one has to look for this reality of self-sacrificial grace in whatever creed one chooses to follow. I have found that the tale of the life and death of Jesus perfectly and profoundly reflects this reality, and that the doctrines of the Christian religion tend to proceed quite naturally from this reality.

TooMuchBaijiu wrote:So, when did you pull off PoMo/Postliberal arguments on me?


Damn, it's been awhile. Off the top of my head I can't think of any specific examples, but generally speaking I tend to view my own arguments and perspective on American (and Chinese) historiography as postliberal. The postliberal elements of my theology tend to emerge when I start talking about competing 'narratives' in secular modernity and hearkening back to forms of mediaeval asceticism or mediaeval communities as templates for possible social change. I also vaguely remember that you didn't seem to take such arguments seriously, hence my comment...
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Ayame » Sun Jun 17, 2012 11:09 pm

Top three...

Emergent/Postmodern
68%
Modern Liberal
54%
Classical Liberal
50%
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Re: Theological perspective quiz

Unread postby Aygor » Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:33 pm

Those are my results having "The Bible is true" as my premise:
Fundamentalist 93%
Roman Catholic 93%
Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan 89%
Charismatic/Pentecostal 57%
Reformed Evangelical 50%
Neo orthodox 50%
Emergent/Postmodern 36%
Classical Liberal 25%
Modern Liberal 14%
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